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50 Over 50

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With a new year comes the realization that the world is another year in what we used to think of as “the future,” and that our childhoods and youth are further and further behind.  But that isn’t a bad thing!  We believe very strongly here at Just Like Family that aging isn’t automatically a bad thing, and, in fact, can bring wonderful benefits with it, like the memories, experience and wisdom that come with the times younger people never lived through.  Which is why we think this list of 50 things people over 50 understand that no one else does is the perfect way to kick off 2014 here on the blog.  You might not think all of these things are “good,” but all of them are absolutely interesting, and it’s incredibly important to acknowledge them, because we can’t know where we’re going in a brand new year if we don’t know where we’ve been!  For example…

“When mail would come twice a day.”

“Burma Shave signs.”

“On a lighter note, the ladies always dressed up to go shopping, dresses or skirts/blouses/sweaters, heels with seamed nylons, hats/gloves. Men wore ties and jackets.”

“Air raid drills in NJ, during the 1950s — having to get under your desk in school or behind a sofa at home with all the shades and curtains pulled, no lights on. Then you’d hear an airplane fly overhead and be terrified it was a bomber.”

“Tin foil on rabbit ears and TV remotes that were connected to the TV with a cord.”

Feel the nostalgia with the rest of the list over HERE on The Huffington Post.


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The Greyist Cities

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A recent trivia question we posted on our Facebook page about the “greyest” country in the world, Monaco, got us thinking about what the most elderly-friendly cities in the United States are, with the largest percentage of senior citizens, and what attracts them there, like mild temperatures and recreation options (like golf and beaches).  It’s obviously an interesting topic to us!  Well, thanks to Business InsiderRetirementhomes.com and Golflink.com, we have the numbers right here, and, sure enough, our own Naples is on the list!

NATIONAL AVERAGE
Senior citizens: 12.9%
Average temperature in November: 63°F
Golf courses: 6.5 per 100K
Retirement homes: 9.1 per 100K

#13 – HOT SPRINGS, AK
Senior citizens: 20.8%
Average temperature in November: 63°F
Golf courses: 62 per 100K
Retirement homes: 34 per 100K

#12 – OCEAN CITY, NJ
Senior citizens: 20.9%
Average temperature in November: 56°F
Golf courses: 204 per 100K
Retirement homes: 7 per 100K

#11 – LAKE HAVASU CITY, AZ
Senior citizens: 21.1%
Average temperature in November: 74°F
Golf courses: 11 per 100K
Retirement homes: 18 per 100K

#10 – PORT SAINT LUCIE, FL
Senior citizens: 22.1%
Average temperature in November: 80°F
Golf courses: 40 per 100K
Retirement homes: 5 per 100K

#9 – CAPE CORAL, FL
Senior citizens: 22.5%
Average temperature in November: 81°F
Golf courses: 57 per 100K
Retirement homes: 5 per 100K

#8 – PRESCOTT, AZ
Senior citizens: 22.6%
Average temperature in November: 60°F
Golf courses: 20 per 100K
Retirement homes: 39 per 100K

#7 – BARNSTABLE, MA
Senior citizens: 23.6%
Average temperature in November: 51°F
Golf courses: 17 per 100K
Retirement homes: 4 per 100K

#6 – PALM COAST, FL
Senior citizens: 24.2%
Average temperature in November: 76°F
Golf courses: 61 per 100K
Retirement homes: 21 per 100K

#5 – OCALA, FL
Senior citizens: 24.2%
Average temperature in November: 77°F
Golf courses: 135 per 100K
Retirement homes: 42 per 100K

#4 – VERO BEACH, FL
Senior citizens: 25.5%
Average temperature in November: 79°F
Golf courses: 187 per 100K
Retirement homes: 99 per 100K

#3 NAPLES, FL
Senior citizens: 25.5%
Average temperature in November: 82°F
Golf courses: 545 per 100K
Retirement homes: 80 per 100K

#2 BRADENTON, FL
Senior citizens: 26.5%
Average temperature in November: 80°F
Golf courses: 159 per 100K
Retirement homes: 65 per 100K

#1 – PUNTA GORDA, FL
Senior citizens: 30.5%
Average temperature in November: 81°F
Golf courses: 348 per 100K
Retirement homes: 98 per 100K


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American Flag Evolution

We all know what tomorrow is, so we thought it would be fun to take a quick look back at all of the variations over the past 237 years of those gorgeous stars and stripes, the American flag!

But there’s a few funny things to be aware of.  First off, the first American flag was NOT the “Betsy Ross Flag” with a circle of thirteen stars.  It was a flag with the familiar stripes, but instead of a field of stars, there was a British Union Flag in their place.  This “Grand Union Flag” was very, very similar to the flag of the British East India Company.  It wasn’t until June 14th, 1777, that an official design was declared by the Continental Congress, and the familiar stars and stripes came into use, but not as a national flag, as a navy ensign, to be flown on naval ships.  And, even more interesting, the resolution passed by Congress was not specific about how the stars and stripes should be arranged, resulting in a wide variety of shapes and arrangements of stars over the years.  Arrangements weren’t made official until the 48-star flag in 1912!  Even the colors weren’t officially locked down until 1934!

In 1795, with fifteen states in the union, the number of stripes was increased from thirteen to fifteen along with the stars.  This could have gotten messy (imagine a flag with 50 stripes!), and, thankfully, they went back to thirteen stripes representing the original Thirteen Colonies in 1818, which was also when the notion of adding a star for each new state was created.  Officially, the flag’s new number of stars (and, now, the official design) becomes official nationwide on the first July 4th after a new state is admitted.  This is why there was a 49-star flag for one year, even though both Alaska and Hawaii became states in 1959, since Alaska became a state in January 1959, causing a 49-star flag to be adopted that July, but Hawaii didn’t become a state until August 1959, causing the current 50-star flag to become official on July 4th, 1960.

And, there are, believe it or not, designs already in stand-by with 51, 52, 53, 54, 55 and 56 stars on them, just in case (one for each of the five U.S. Territories and DC, probably,  in case they become states).

Whew!  Really, we could go on forever (did we mention the Betsy Ross story is probably a legend, and that New Jersey’s Francis Hopkinson probably was the actual designer of the 1777 flag?), but we’ll stop now, let you get back to your fireworks and cookouts, and let you take a look at this gallery of flags through the years!