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Calculating the Cost of Home Care Infographic

Delivering care to an ill or elderly loved one in their own home ensures their safety, preserves their independence and accommodates hardworking families who are unable to personally address all of their loved one’s needs. As a result, more families are finding that home care is the option their loved ones prefer and their budgets support.

At Just Like Family Home Care, we take pride in aligning the right star with each clients personalized preferences. We believe it is important, as a Naples home health care company, to maintain our clients lifestyle in the comfort of their home, hospital or facility.

Calculating the cist of at home care


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Spring Cleaning!

Spring “sprung” back on March 20, but it doesn’t really start feeling like the season until April comes around.  Once it’s April, you can really feel the change in the air (and the air finally getting above freezing up north!).  Spring brings spring rain, spring flowers, and, of course, spring cleaning!  It’s a great idea to clean out the old living space once a year, and make certain you aren’t drowning in superfluous flotsam.  When you’re older, it can be very easy to let decades’ worth of living take over your home, and be lacking the physical capabilities to do something about it.  You may not even be able to keep up with simple housecleaning chores throughout the year because of poor health or mobility, making that annual purge all the more important.

So, where do you even start?  And how do you stay safe while you clean?

Make a List

The first thing to do is make a list for yourself of what you’re going to be cleaning, so you can keep it all straight and make sure you get to everything you want to.  Doubly important is a list of safety tasks to make sure you’re keeping yourself safe while you clean, like making certain hallways are clear of clutter that you could trip over, getting rid of expired food or medications, and making certain bulbs in lights and batteries in smoke/carbon monoxide detectors are up to snuff.

Get a Crew Together

Once you know what you’re going to be cleaning, don’t try to do it alone!  Get your friends and family to help you.  Not only will this make it take less time, it’ll make the effort far safer, and far more fun.  Don’t overexert yourself, and never lift heavy objects on your own!  And remember, you’re never alone: many retirement communities even have “cleaning clubs” to take care of these sorts of things as a community.

Make it a Party

Use this opportunity to be social and make stronger connections with your loved ones.  Cook for everyone and play bouncy music while you work to help pass the time and make the affair a positive experience for everyone.

Start with the Piles

Are there piles of clutter in your home?  Start there!   Organize those large piles first, don’t just go around them.  You can’t very well be sweeping the floor with piles of magazines and knickknacks in the way!

Don’t be Afraid to Trash

It can be hard to let go of some things, but you should always be ready for the future.  Use this opportunity to throw away now-useless items that are just taking up space.  This will reduce dangerous clutter, and also get you ready in case you have to move to a smaller home in the future.  If you can’t bring yourself to throw away something, but know, in your heart, you don’t need it, give it to a loved one for safekeeping instead.

Don’t Ignore the Details

Scrub and polish every surface, and sweep every floor.  Make sure there’s nothing left that could cause a fall in the future, and cover any potentially slippery surfaces with a rug.

Double Check Before you Finish

Before you wrap up the cleaning, double-check those bulbs and batteries, and make a note of anything you need, like new medications, replenished emergency supplies, fire extinguishers, and lists of emergency contacts.  Don’t just clean, make sure you’re prepared.


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How to Avoid Falling

For those times you want to be independent, From the Mayo Clinic’s “Healthy Aging” section

 

Fall prevention may not seem like a lively topic, but it’s important. As you get older, physical changes and health conditions — and sometimes the medications used to treat those conditions — make falls more likely. In fact, falls are a leading cause of injury among older adults. Still, fear of falling doesn’t need to rule your life. Instead, consider six simple fall-prevention strategies.

1. Make an appointment with your doctor

Begin your fall-prevention plan by making an appointment with your doctor. Be prepared to answer questions such as:

  • What medications are you taking? Make a list of your prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements, or bring them with you to the appointment. Your doctor can review your medications for side effects and interactions that may increase your risk of falling. To help with fall prevention, your doctor may consider weaning you off certain medications — such as sedatives and some types of antidepressants.
  • Have you fallen before? Write down the details, including when, where and how you fell. Be prepared to discuss instances when you almost fell but were caught by someone or managed to grab hold of something just in time. Details such as these may help your doctor identify specific fall-prevention strategies.
  • Could your health conditions cause a fall? Certain eye and ear disorders may increase your risk of falls. Be prepared to discuss your health conditions and how comfortable you are when you walk — for example, do you feel any dizziness, joint pain, numbness or shortness of breath when you walk? Your doctor may evaluate your muscle strength, balance and walking style (gait) as well.

2. Keep moving

Physical activity can go a long way toward fall prevention. With your doctor’s OK, consider activities such as walking, water workouts or tai chi — a gentle exercise that involves slow and graceful dance-like movements. Such activities reduce the risk of falls by improving strength, balance, coordination and flexibility.

If you avoid physical activity because you’re afraid it will make a fall more likely, tell your doctor. He or she may recommend carefully monitored exercise programs or refer you to a physical therapist. The physical therapist can create a custom exercise program aimed at improving your balance, flexibility, muscle strength and gait.

3. Wear sensible shoes

Consider changing your footwear as part of your fall-prevention plan. High heels, floppy slippers and shoes with slick soles can make you slip, stumble and fall. So can walking in your stocking feet. Instead:

  • Have your feet measured each time you buy shoes, since foot size can change.
  • Buy properly fitting, sturdy shoes with nonskid soles.
  • Avoid shoes with extra-thick soles.
  • Choose lace-up shoes instead of slip-ons, and keep the laces tied. If you have trouble tying laces, select footwear with fabric fasteners.
  • If you’re a woman who can’t find wide enough shoes, try men’s shoes.]

4. Remove home hazards

Take a look around your home. Your living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, hallways and stairways may be filled with hazards. To make your home safer:

  • Remove boxes, newspapers, electrical cords and phone cords from walkways.
  • Move coffee tables, magazine racks and plant stands from high-traffic areas.
  • Secure loose rugs with double-faced tape, tacks or a slip-resistant backing — or remove loose rugs from your home.
  • Repair loose, wooden floorboards and carpeting right away.
  • Store clothing, dishes, food and other necessities within easy reach.
  • Immediately clean spilled liquids, grease or food.
  • Use nonskid floor wax.
  • Use nonslip mats in your bathtub or shower.

5. Light up your living space

Keep your home brightly lit to avoid tripping on objects that are hard to see. Also:

  • Place night lights in your bedroom, bathroom and hallways.
  • Place a lamp within reach of your bed for middle-of-the-night needs.
  • Make clear paths to light switches that aren’t near room entrances. Consider trading traditional switches for glow-in-the-dark or illuminated switches.
  • Turn on the lights before going up or down stairs.
  • Store flashlights in easy-to-find places in case of power outages.

6. Use assistive devices

Your doctor might recommend using a cane or walker to keep you steady. Other assistive devices can help, too. For example:

  • Hand rails for both sides of stairways
  • Nonslip treads for bare-wood steps
  • A raised toilet seat or one with armrests
  • Grab bars for the shower or tub
  • A sturdy plastic seat for the shower or tub — plus a hand-held shower nozzle for bathing while sitting down

If necessary, ask your doctor for a referral to an occupational therapist. He or she can help you brainstorm other fall-prevention strategies. Some solutions are easily installed and relatively inexpensive. Others may require professional help or a larger investment. If you’re concerned about the cost, remember that an investment in fall prevention is an investment in your independence.


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Hurricane Prep for Seniors

Direct from Florida Power and Light, here are tips for senior citizens to stay safe during the Hurricane Season!

hurricane1

What are my options if a hurricane approaches?

Plan A: STAY HOME.
If you don’t live in an evacuation zone or a manufactured/mobile home, stay home and take these
precautions:
  • Remain calm and gather all supplies that you will need EARLY
  • Establish a “safe room” in an interior room with no window. Bring needed supplies including battery-powered radio, flashlights, medication, food and drinking water into this room.
  • Make sure that your home is secure and shuttered, and that it can withstand a hurricane. Ask neighbors to
  • assist with preparations if necessary.
  • Make sure that a neighbor or someone in your family knows that you will be there.
Plan B: STAY WITH LOCAL FRIENDS.
If you plan to stay with family or friends during a hurricane, take these precautions:
  • Remain calm. Call them in advance. Make sure they will be ready for you.
  • Have a backup plan in case they are out of town.
  • Have the enclosed checklists completed outlining your needs.
  • Bring your own food, water, medicine supply and important papers with you.
  • If your loved one has dementia, ask to have a room just for you and your loved one. Ask them to take the same safety precautions you have in your home (e.g., hide sharp objects and poisons, limit access to exits, cover mirrors).
  • Notify your friends/family/neighbors of your evacuation plans.
Plan C: RELOCATE OUTSIDE THE AREA.
If you live in an evacuation zone and/or a mobile/manufactured home, you must relocate.
  • Remain calm. LEAVE EARLY and let others know where you are planning to go.
  • Have a full tank of gas and a current, easy-to-read map handy.
  • Know where you are going. If you are going to a hotel, make sure that you have a reservation, as many hotels, even a hundred miles away, will fill up quickly.
  • Have the enclosed checklists completed outlining your needs.
Plan D: GO TO A SHELTER.
If you plan on going to a shelter you may need to be prepared for an extended stay. Take these precautions:
  • Make arrangements for your pets EARLY – before hurricane season starts. Red Cross shelters do not allow pets. Ask your veterinarian if there are pet-friendly shelters in your area.
  • Prepare supplies that you can bring with you; e.g., IMPORTANT PAPERS, FOOD, WATER, medications, a change of clothes, snacks, personal hygiene supplies, etc. You may also need to bring a sleeping bag/folding cot. Please check with your shelter officials.
  • Make sure that the shelter you are going to is open and has space. Watch the local media for updates.
  • Bring your cell phone (if you have one) and your charger or extra batteries.
  • Notify your friends/family/neighbors of your evacuation plans.
  • In all cases, early preparation is the key to surviving a hurricane with as little discomfort as possible. If you need assistance at any point, be sure to contact your local social service agencies as early as possible, as agency employees will also be preparing for the hurricane and cannot assist you at the last minute!