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50 Over 50

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With a new year comes the realization that the world is another year in what we used to think of as “the future,” and that our childhoods and youth are further and further behind.  But that isn’t a bad thing!  We believe very strongly here at Just Like Family that aging isn’t automatically a bad thing, and, in fact, can bring wonderful benefits with it, like the memories, experience and wisdom that come with the times younger people never lived through.  Which is why we think this list of 50 things people over 50 understand that no one else does is the perfect way to kick off 2014 here on the blog.  You might not think all of these things are “good,” but all of them are absolutely interesting, and it’s incredibly important to acknowledge them, because we can’t know where we’re going in a brand new year if we don’t know where we’ve been!  For example…

“When mail would come twice a day.”

“Burma Shave signs.”

“On a lighter note, the ladies always dressed up to go shopping, dresses or skirts/blouses/sweaters, heels with seamed nylons, hats/gloves. Men wore ties and jackets.”

“Air raid drills in NJ, during the 1950s — having to get under your desk in school or behind a sofa at home with all the shades and curtains pulled, no lights on. Then you’d hear an airplane fly overhead and be terrified it was a bomber.”

“Tin foil on rabbit ears and TV remotes that were connected to the TV with a cord.”

Feel the nostalgia with the rest of the list over HERE on The Huffington Post.


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The Greyist Cities

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A recent trivia question we posted on our Facebook page about the “greyest” country in the world, Monaco, got us thinking about what the most elderly-friendly cities in the United States are, with the largest percentage of senior citizens, and what attracts them there, like mild temperatures and recreation options (like golf and beaches).  It’s obviously an interesting topic to us!  Well, thanks to Business InsiderRetirementhomes.com and Golflink.com, we have the numbers right here, and, sure enough, our own Naples is on the list!

NATIONAL AVERAGE
Senior citizens: 12.9%
Average temperature in November: 63°F
Golf courses: 6.5 per 100K
Retirement homes: 9.1 per 100K

#13 – HOT SPRINGS, AK
Senior citizens: 20.8%
Average temperature in November: 63°F
Golf courses: 62 per 100K
Retirement homes: 34 per 100K

#12 – OCEAN CITY, NJ
Senior citizens: 20.9%
Average temperature in November: 56°F
Golf courses: 204 per 100K
Retirement homes: 7 per 100K

#11 – LAKE HAVASU CITY, AZ
Senior citizens: 21.1%
Average temperature in November: 74°F
Golf courses: 11 per 100K
Retirement homes: 18 per 100K

#10 – PORT SAINT LUCIE, FL
Senior citizens: 22.1%
Average temperature in November: 80°F
Golf courses: 40 per 100K
Retirement homes: 5 per 100K

#9 – CAPE CORAL, FL
Senior citizens: 22.5%
Average temperature in November: 81°F
Golf courses: 57 per 100K
Retirement homes: 5 per 100K

#8 – PRESCOTT, AZ
Senior citizens: 22.6%
Average temperature in November: 60°F
Golf courses: 20 per 100K
Retirement homes: 39 per 100K

#7 – BARNSTABLE, MA
Senior citizens: 23.6%
Average temperature in November: 51°F
Golf courses: 17 per 100K
Retirement homes: 4 per 100K

#6 – PALM COAST, FL
Senior citizens: 24.2%
Average temperature in November: 76°F
Golf courses: 61 per 100K
Retirement homes: 21 per 100K

#5 – OCALA, FL
Senior citizens: 24.2%
Average temperature in November: 77°F
Golf courses: 135 per 100K
Retirement homes: 42 per 100K

#4 – VERO BEACH, FL
Senior citizens: 25.5%
Average temperature in November: 79°F
Golf courses: 187 per 100K
Retirement homes: 99 per 100K

#3 NAPLES, FL
Senior citizens: 25.5%
Average temperature in November: 82°F
Golf courses: 545 per 100K
Retirement homes: 80 per 100K

#2 BRADENTON, FL
Senior citizens: 26.5%
Average temperature in November: 80°F
Golf courses: 159 per 100K
Retirement homes: 65 per 100K

#1 – PUNTA GORDA, FL
Senior citizens: 30.5%
Average temperature in November: 81°F
Golf courses: 348 per 100K
Retirement homes: 98 per 100K


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General Health Tips for Seniors

If you’re over 65, staying healthy and in shape takes on a few extra dimensions.  It’s much harder, it takes much more work, and your body is much more finicky about what you can and can’t do than it was just a few years earlier.  It can be very hard to do it, but staying fit and healthy is essential for long and happy Golden Years!  Parent Giving shared a great list of tips that we would like to share with you to help you get started.  They may not all apply to you or your lifestyle, but whichever of them do are definitely to be kept in mind.  You can find the original here.

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  1. Quit smoking. Take this critical step to improve your health and combat aging. Smoking kills by causing cancer, strokes and heart failure. Smoking leads to erectile dysfunction in men due to atherosclerosis and to excessive wrinkling by attacking skin elasticity. Many resources are available to help you quit.
  2. Keep active. Do something to keep fit each day—something you enjoy that maintains strength, balance and flexibility and promotes cardiovascular health. Physical activity helps you stay at a healthy weight, prevent or control illness, sleep better, reduce stress, avoid falls and look and feel better, too.
  3. Eat well. Combined with physical activity, eating nutritious foods in the right amounts can help keep you healthy. Many illnesses, such as heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and osteoporosis, can be prevented or controlled with dietary changes and exercise. Calcium and vitamin D supplements can help women prevent osteoporosis.
  4. Maintain a healthy weight. Extra weight increases your risk for heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Use the Kaiser Permanente BMI (body mass index) calculator to find out what you should weigh for your height. Get to your healthy weight and stay there by eating right and keeping active. Replace sugary drinks with water—water is calorie free!
  5. Prevent falls. We become vulnerable to falls as we age. Prevent falls and injury by removing loose carpet or throw rugs. Keep paths clear of electrical cords and clutter, and use night-lights in hallways and bathrooms. Did you know that people who walk barefoot fall more frequently? Wear shoes with good support to reduce the risk of falling.
  6. Stay up-to-date on immunizations and other health screenings. By age 50, women should begin mammography screening for breast cancer. Men can be checked for prostate cancer. Many preventive screenings are available. Those who are new to Medicare are entitled to a “Welcome to Medicare” visit and all Medicare members to an annual wellness visit. Use these visits to discuss which preventative screenings and vaccinations are due.
  7. Prevent skin cancer. As we age, our skin grows thinner; it becomes drier and less elastic. Wrinkles appear, and cuts and bruises take longer to heal. Be sure to protect your skin from the sun. Too much sun and ultraviolet rays can cause skin cancer.
  8. Get regular dental, vision and hearing checkups. Your teeth and gums will last a lifetime if you care for them properly—that means daily brushing and flossing and getting regular dental checkups. By age 50, most people notice changes to their vision, including a gradual decline in the ability to see small print or focus on close objects. Common eye problems that can impair vision include cataracts and glaucoma. Hearing loss occurs commonly with aging, often due to exposure to loud noise.
  9. Manage stress. Try exercise or relaxation techniques—perhaps meditation or yoga—as a means of coping. Make time for friends and social contacts and fun. Successful coping can affect our health and how we feel. Learn the role of positive thinking.
  10. Fan the flame. When it comes to sexual intimacy and aging, age is no reason to limit your sexual enjoyment. Learn about physical changes that come with aging and get suggestions to help you adjust to them, if necessary.