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Southwest Florida Origins

We recently told everyone about our expanded service area…

coverageIn case you missed it, we cover seven counties in Southwest Florida now, Sarasota, DeSoto, Charlotte, Glades, Lee, Hendry, and Collier Counties.  We’re fans of history around here (that massive gallery of old American flags on Independence Day might have given that away…), but in Florida, history usually means Tampa and Miami.  What about Southwest Florida?  Well, we’ve got you covered.  We’re going to go over some of the more interesting history in our coverage area over several blogs, coming back to the subject every now and then.  To kick things off, lets take a quick look at those seven counties.  Specifically, why are they called what they’re called, and where did they come from?  Those county names reflect a lot of the history around here, so let’s get going!

Charlotte County

Seal_of_Charlotte_County,_FloridaFormed out of part of DeSoto county in 1921, the county was named for the Bay of Charlotte Harbor, which was in turn named for Queen Charlotte Sophia, wife of King George III, in 1775.  The Spanish originally called it “Carlos Bay,” so we almost had a “Carlos County”!

Collier County

Seal_of_Collier_County,_Florida

Carved out of Lee County in 1923, Collier County was named for Baron Collier, a New York real estate developer and businessman who moved to SWFL and built the Tamiami Trail for the state in exchange for having a county named after him!

DeSoto County

DeSoto_County_Fl_SealThis one is fairly self-explanatory.  Created in 1887 out of what was then Manatee County, it was named for Hernando de Soto (1496/1497–1542), Spanish explorer and conquistador.  He famously was the first European to cross the Mississippi River, and likely first landed in Florida on that voyage very near modern day DeSoto County.

Glades County

glades

Formed in 1921 from DeSoto County, the county was named after the nearby Everglades, which were, in turn, were named partly by British surveyor John Gerard de Brahm in 1773, who called the area “River Glades.”

Hendry County

county_logo_

Formed out of Lee County in 1923, it was named for Francis A. Hendry (1833–1917), a Florida cattle rancher and politician who was an early settler of the area, and an officer in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.

Lee County

Lee_County_Fl_Seal

Carved out of the original, massive Monroe County in 1887, Lee was named for famed Confederate General Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), and has grown to become, by far, the largest county in Southwest Florida.

Sarasota County

393px-Logo_of_Sarasota_County_FL.svg

Founded in 1921 out of Manatee County.  Believe it or not, the word “Sarasota” is of unknown, probably Native American, origin.  The word has been used in the area since nearly the very beginning of European colonization, but there’s no record of where it came from.  A possibility is that it’s a Calusa (the original Native language in the area) word meaning “point of rocks” or “place of the dance.”  Again, there’s no way to know for sure!


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Kelly Dillaha joins Just Like Family Home Care

Kelly JLFJust Like Family Home Care, a family-owned and operated home care company servicing seven Southwest Florida counties, has announced that Kelly Dillaha joined the firm as a the Community Relations Representative for Lee County.

Dillaha previously spent three and a half years at Scotlynn USA Division Inc. in Fort Myers working as an Office Manager, Accountant and HR Manager. Previously she spent time as a Child Protective Investigator for the Florida Department of Children and Families. Dillaha graduated from Mariner High School in Cape Coral before receiving her bachelor’s degree in Business Management from Florida Gulf Coast University.

Just Like Family Home Care owner Elisabeth Nassberg says, “Kelly portrays every quality we desire in our employees at Just Like Family Home Care. The combination of her work history and outgoing personality will make her a great fit at Just Like Family Home Care. I am confident that she will represent our company well in the Lee County area.” Nassberg and Dillaha met last year on the Love That Dress! 2013 in Collier County, and both are passionate about supporting local charities in Collier and Lee Counties.

Just Like Family Home Care is a personalized home care company dedicated to caring for its customer’s loved ones with an easy, professional and loving dedication to their clients. “I am beyond thrilled to join the Just Like Family team. I am excited that this new opportunity allows me to be out in the community that I grew up in,” says Dillaha. “Plus, JLF is one big family and it already feels like I am a part of it.”

In her free time, Dillaha enjoys dance, Zumba, going to the gym and spending time with her husband. Dillaha is currently the Silent Auction Chair for the 2014 Love That Dress! in Collier County.

 


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Calling All Home Health Aides, Companions and Nurse Assistants!

Home-Health-Aide

Just Like Family Home Care has an immediate need for Companions, Home Health Aides and Certified Nurse Assistants in Collier and Lee counties.  Typical clients will need you to provide companionship, personal care, meal preparation, light housekeeping and/or shopping and errands to patients in their homes as needed.  Various shifts, including evenings & weekends, are available, and we offer competitive pay as well as a warm, happy, family-like atmosphere.  We have a specific need for registrants who are interested in doing small day shifts, four hours or less.  You will love working with our experienced office staff, and feel good about what you are doing!

You must be at least 18 years of age, mature and emotionally stable, and capable of displaying empathy and sympathy towards patients at home who have medical problems or are infirm.  Many clients want to feel like they’re being taken care of by someone who could be their own child or grandchild, so a genuinely caring and invested attitude are absolutely essential.

To apply, send a resume and cover letter to application@jlfhc.com.  We’re looking forward to hearing from you!


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Aging Maps

Viewing information, especially numbers, can be trying.  It’s hard to get a good feel for what, exactly, is happening, when you’re looking at a wall of numbers.  Displaying that info as maps makes it much easier to digest, and can be a great way to get informed about a specific subject.  And what better subject for us, than one that comes close to our hearts: aging in America.  It’s common knowledge which states are the “oldest,” but about what counties are the oldest?  Well…

map_65plusInteresting, isn’t it?  You have the obvious I-4 Corridor, Naples area, Fort Myers area and West Palm Beach areas there, but what’s going on with that wide band of elderly that roughly parallels Tornado Alley?  Or the Port Angeles area of Washington State?  And that one bright red county on the Jersey Shore?

If this is what the distribution of elderly looks like, what about elderly in need of care?

map_aged_disabilities

Wow.  Florida suddenly looks like a spring chicken, while broad swaths of the South, especially Eastern Kentucky, are in intense need of care.  We wouldn’t be surprised if this map overlaps with a map of poverty levels.  Lack of access to proper care frequently has more to do with income than age.

But what about how things are changing going forward?  Are some areas getting older and some younger?  Glad you asked.  These are changes in median ages from the 2010 Census to 2012 Census estimates, on a county-level.

NESENWSWAKHIIn short, most of the country is getting slowly older, while that same elderly corridor in the Midwest from earlier is getting younger!  Let’s take a look at our local two “core” counties.

CollierLeeA gradual uptick in both, but not a strong one.

In short, it’s very interesting to look at maps like these, and get a “big picture” view of aging in America.  And, as anyone can see, issues related to aging and lack of care for the disabled elderly will only become more serious as time goes on, with a universally greying population.