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Kelly Dillaha joins Just Like Family Home Care

Kelly JLFJust Like Family Home Care, a family-owned and operated home care company servicing seven Southwest Florida counties, has announced that Kelly Dillaha joined the firm as a the Community Relations Representative for Lee County.

Dillaha previously spent three and a half years at Scotlynn USA Division Inc. in Fort Myers working as an Office Manager, Accountant and HR Manager. Previously she spent time as a Child Protective Investigator for the Florida Department of Children and Families. Dillaha graduated from Mariner High School in Cape Coral before receiving her bachelor’s degree in Business Management from Florida Gulf Coast University.

Just Like Family Home Care owner Elisabeth Nassberg says, “Kelly portrays every quality we desire in our employees at Just Like Family Home Care. The combination of her work history and outgoing personality will make her a great fit at Just Like Family Home Care. I am confident that she will represent our company well in the Lee County area.” Nassberg and Dillaha met last year on the Love That Dress! 2013 in Collier County, and both are passionate about supporting local charities in Collier and Lee Counties.

Just Like Family Home Care is a personalized home care company dedicated to caring for its customer’s loved ones with an easy, professional and loving dedication to their clients. “I am beyond thrilled to join the Just Like Family team. I am excited that this new opportunity allows me to be out in the community that I grew up in,” says Dillaha. “Plus, JLF is one big family and it already feels like I am a part of it.”

In her free time, Dillaha enjoys dance, Zumba, going to the gym and spending time with her husband. Dillaha is currently the Silent Auction Chair for the 2014 Love That Dress! in Collier County.

 


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Spring Cleaning!

Spring “sprung” back on March 20, but it doesn’t really start feeling like the season until April comes around.  Once it’s April, you can really feel the change in the air (and the air finally getting above freezing up north!).  Spring brings spring rain, spring flowers, and, of course, spring cleaning!  It’s a great idea to clean out the old living space once a year, and make certain you aren’t drowning in superfluous flotsam.  When you’re older, it can be very easy to let decades’ worth of living take over your home, and be lacking the physical capabilities to do something about it.  You may not even be able to keep up with simple housecleaning chores throughout the year because of poor health or mobility, making that annual purge all the more important.

So, where do you even start?  And how do you stay safe while you clean?

Make a List

The first thing to do is make a list for yourself of what you’re going to be cleaning, so you can keep it all straight and make sure you get to everything you want to.  Doubly important is a list of safety tasks to make sure you’re keeping yourself safe while you clean, like making certain hallways are clear of clutter that you could trip over, getting rid of expired food or medications, and making certain bulbs in lights and batteries in smoke/carbon monoxide detectors are up to snuff.

Get a Crew Together

Once you know what you’re going to be cleaning, don’t try to do it alone!  Get your friends and family to help you.  Not only will this make it take less time, it’ll make the effort far safer, and far more fun.  Don’t overexert yourself, and never lift heavy objects on your own!  And remember, you’re never alone: many retirement communities even have “cleaning clubs” to take care of these sorts of things as a community.

Make it a Party

Use this opportunity to be social and make stronger connections with your loved ones.  Cook for everyone and play bouncy music while you work to help pass the time and make the affair a positive experience for everyone.

Start with the Piles

Are there piles of clutter in your home?  Start there!   Organize those large piles first, don’t just go around them.  You can’t very well be sweeping the floor with piles of magazines and knickknacks in the way!

Don’t be Afraid to Trash

It can be hard to let go of some things, but you should always be ready for the future.  Use this opportunity to throw away now-useless items that are just taking up space.  This will reduce dangerous clutter, and also get you ready in case you have to move to a smaller home in the future.  If you can’t bring yourself to throw away something, but know, in your heart, you don’t need it, give it to a loved one for safekeeping instead.

Don’t Ignore the Details

Scrub and polish every surface, and sweep every floor.  Make sure there’s nothing left that could cause a fall in the future, and cover any potentially slippery surfaces with a rug.

Double Check Before you Finish

Before you wrap up the cleaning, double-check those bulbs and batteries, and make a note of anything you need, like new medications, replenished emergency supplies, fire extinguishers, and lists of emergency contacts.  Don’t just clean, make sure you’re prepared.


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Resolutions for Seniors

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Christmas is behind us, New Year’s is ahead!  Which means it’s just about time to come up with new resolutions.  But what to resolve yourself for?  Different things are important to different people!  If you’re heavier than you’d like, your biggest resolution may be to lose weight.  If you want to be more intellectually stimulated this year, you might resolve to read a book a month.  What if you’re elderly or infirm, though?  What kinds of resolution can you make to stay positive and healthy and happy?  A few years ago, a retired teacher and widower named Mary Carol Herwood from the Buffalo, NY area wrote a great article to that effect for Yahoo!  Sure, it was for New Year’s 2010, not 2014, but things haven’t changed that much in four years, and she really did have some great suggestions.  She writes regularly for Yahoo!, including some great movie reviews, so you should definitely check out some of her other content.  But for this time of year, this is the article we’re interested in.  We can’t put the whole article here, you’ll have to read it on Yahoo!, but here’s our favorite of her suggestions to get you started!

“I will make plans more often to call a friend to take in a play or a movie, stop for a bite to eat and chit-chat about this and that.”

This one is our absolute favorite, as maintaining friendships and connections with others into old age is, in many ways, one of the absolute most important things to an elderly person’s continued well-being.  It can be very easy to fall into the trap of letting this part of your life go as you age, as family and health issues take up more and more of your time, but the elderly are just as in need of companionship, friendship and fun as any of us!

“I will read at least one book each month.”

Reading is a wonderfully effective and fun way to keep one’s mind sharp, and has also been proven to be an excellent deterrent to the development of neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s Disease.

“I will not make any New Year’s Resolutions in 2010.”

Replace “2010” for “2014” here, but the point stands.  If you feel happy and satisfied with everything in your life, then mission accomplished!  So what better resolution to make than to have no resolutions to make next year?

Read the entire article HERE, and a happy early 2014!


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Happy Holidays from Just Like Family

Tonight is the first night of Hanukkah, tomorrow is Thanksgiving, and Christmas and New Year’s are just around the corner!  It’s one of our favorite times of year, full of family, friends, food and happy memories.  So, from our family to yours, we have just one thing to say:

Happy Holidays!Happy holidays, everyone!


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Hurricane Prep for Seniors

Direct from Florida Power and Light, here are tips for senior citizens to stay safe during the Hurricane Season!

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What are my options if a hurricane approaches?

Plan A: STAY HOME.
If you don’t live in an evacuation zone or a manufactured/mobile home, stay home and take these
precautions:
  • Remain calm and gather all supplies that you will need EARLY
  • Establish a “safe room” in an interior room with no window. Bring needed supplies including battery-powered radio, flashlights, medication, food and drinking water into this room.
  • Make sure that your home is secure and shuttered, and that it can withstand a hurricane. Ask neighbors to
  • assist with preparations if necessary.
  • Make sure that a neighbor or someone in your family knows that you will be there.
Plan B: STAY WITH LOCAL FRIENDS.
If you plan to stay with family or friends during a hurricane, take these precautions:
  • Remain calm. Call them in advance. Make sure they will be ready for you.
  • Have a backup plan in case they are out of town.
  • Have the enclosed checklists completed outlining your needs.
  • Bring your own food, water, medicine supply and important papers with you.
  • If your loved one has dementia, ask to have a room just for you and your loved one. Ask them to take the same safety precautions you have in your home (e.g., hide sharp objects and poisons, limit access to exits, cover mirrors).
  • Notify your friends/family/neighbors of your evacuation plans.
Plan C: RELOCATE OUTSIDE THE AREA.
If you live in an evacuation zone and/or a mobile/manufactured home, you must relocate.
  • Remain calm. LEAVE EARLY and let others know where you are planning to go.
  • Have a full tank of gas and a current, easy-to-read map handy.
  • Know where you are going. If you are going to a hotel, make sure that you have a reservation, as many hotels, even a hundred miles away, will fill up quickly.
  • Have the enclosed checklists completed outlining your needs.
Plan D: GO TO A SHELTER.
If you plan on going to a shelter you may need to be prepared for an extended stay. Take these precautions:
  • Make arrangements for your pets EARLY – before hurricane season starts. Red Cross shelters do not allow pets. Ask your veterinarian if there are pet-friendly shelters in your area.
  • Prepare supplies that you can bring with you; e.g., IMPORTANT PAPERS, FOOD, WATER, medications, a change of clothes, snacks, personal hygiene supplies, etc. You may also need to bring a sleeping bag/folding cot. Please check with your shelter officials.
  • Make sure that the shelter you are going to is open and has space. Watch the local media for updates.
  • Bring your cell phone (if you have one) and your charger or extra batteries.
  • Notify your friends/family/neighbors of your evacuation plans.
  • In all cases, early preparation is the key to surviving a hurricane with as little discomfort as possible. If you need assistance at any point, be sure to contact your local social service agencies as early as possible, as agency employees will also be preparing for the hurricane and cannot assist you at the last minute!