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The License Plate Game – Florida Style

Remember the old “license plate game” you played as a kid?  It occurs to us that there’s an easy, fun way to play this game with friends as an adult, and Florida’s unique status as “most visited” state makes it easy.  Go for a walk in Naples, or Fort Myers, or any other reasonably-sized city in Florida, and as you go, check out the plates on each car.

Be the first to call out plates from Florida, Georgia or Alabama, and give yourself one point.  For South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee or Mississippi, make that two points.  Three points for Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky or Virginia.  Four points for Maryland, the District of Columbia, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, or Texas.  Five points for Delaware, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, or New Mexico.  Six points for New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Utah, or Arizona.  Seven points for Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, and California.  Eight points for Rhode Island, New Hampshire, or Maine.  Nine points for the Canadian Provinces, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia.  And, finally, ten points for the three Canadian Territories, Nunavut, Northwest Territories, and Yukon, and for Alaska and Hawaii.  If, by some miracle, you spot a plate from one of the five US Territories, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands, Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, or American Samoa, you just win automatically!

If you call out one that’s already been called, or you mistake a plate for another, you lose the amount of points the ACTUAL plate is worth.

Pick a street to walk the length of, an area of a street to walk, or maybe even an entire neighborhood, and tally up your points at the end to see who won!

Need a primer on what all of those plates look like, to give yourself an advantage?  Or need the points handy?  Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered!

4KNWz6G

canadian plates

1 POINT: AL, FL, GA

2 POINTS: MS, NC, SC, TN

3 POINTS: AR. KY, LA, MO, VA

4 POINTS: DC, IA, IL, IN, KS, MD, NE, OH, OK, TX, WV

5 POINTS: CO, DE, MI, MN, NM, PA, SD, WI, WY

6 POINTS: AZ, ID, MT, ND, NJ, NY, UT

7 POINTS: CA, CT, MA, NV, OR, VT, WA

8 POINTS: ME, NH, RI

9 POINTS: AB, BC, MB, NB, NL, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK

10 POINTS: AK, HI, NT, NU, YT

AUTOMATIC WIN: AS, GU, MP, PR, VI

And, don’t forget to check the backs AND fronts of cars!

plate rules


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Aging Maps

Viewing information, especially numbers, can be trying.  It’s hard to get a good feel for what, exactly, is happening, when you’re looking at a wall of numbers.  Displaying that info as maps makes it much easier to digest, and can be a great way to get informed about a specific subject.  And what better subject for us, than one that comes close to our hearts: aging in America.  It’s common knowledge which states are the “oldest,” but about what counties are the oldest?  Well…

map_65plusInteresting, isn’t it?  You have the obvious I-4 Corridor, Naples area, Fort Myers area and West Palm Beach areas there, but what’s going on with that wide band of elderly that roughly parallels Tornado Alley?  Or the Port Angeles area of Washington State?  And that one bright red county on the Jersey Shore?

If this is what the distribution of elderly looks like, what about elderly in need of care?

map_aged_disabilities

Wow.  Florida suddenly looks like a spring chicken, while broad swaths of the South, especially Eastern Kentucky, are in intense need of care.  We wouldn’t be surprised if this map overlaps with a map of poverty levels.  Lack of access to proper care frequently has more to do with income than age.

But what about how things are changing going forward?  Are some areas getting older and some younger?  Glad you asked.  These are changes in median ages from the 2010 Census to 2012 Census estimates, on a county-level.

NESENWSWAKHIIn short, most of the country is getting slowly older, while that same elderly corridor in the Midwest from earlier is getting younger!  Let’s take a look at our local two “core” counties.

CollierLeeA gradual uptick in both, but not a strong one.

In short, it’s very interesting to look at maps like these, and get a “big picture” view of aging in America.  And, as anyone can see, issues related to aging and lack of care for the disabled elderly will only become more serious as time goes on, with a universally greying population.