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Fun Family Christmas Movies

santa clause movie

Source: IMDB

The kids can’t wait to open presents, and you probably can’t wait to see if you got a little something yourself. What do you do on Christmas Eve to keep everyone occupied and away from the gifts? You could go out, but that’s what everyone is going to do so don’t be surprised if places are crowded. What about the park? That’s a great idea, but only if you’re in a place where the weather permits. So if you want to stay indoors, you can pop in a movie or bring on up on Netflix or another streaming service.

Here are some great Christmas-themed family-friendly movies to watch with everyone.

Elf
After inadvertently wreaking havoc on the elf community due to his ungainly size, a man raised as an elf at the North Pole is sent to the U.S. in search of his true identity. (IMDB)

The Nightmare Before Christmas
Jack Skellington, king of Halloween Town, discovers Christmas Town, but doesn’t quite understand the concept. (IMDB)

The Santa Clause
When a man inadvertantly kills Santa on Christmas Eve, he finds himself magically recruited to take his place. (IMDB)

How the Grinch Stole Christmas
On the outskirts of Whoville, there lives a green, revenge-seeking Grinch who plans on ruining the Christmas holiday for all of the citizens of the town. (IMDB)

Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town
A mailman reveals the origin of Santa Claus. (IMDB)

Prancer
A farm girl nurses a wounded reindeer she believes is one of Santa’s, hoping to bring it back to health in time for Christmas. Her holiday spirit inspires those around her, something her disheartened father is having trouble understanding. (IMDB)

The Year Without a Santa Claus
When a weary and discouraged Santa Claus considers skipping his Christmas Eve run one year, Mrs. Claus and his Elves set out to change his mind. (IMDB)

A Charlie Brown Christmas
Repelled by the commercialism he sees around him, Charlie Brown tries to find the true meaning of Christmas. (IMDB)

It’s a Spongebob Christmas
It’s a SpongeBob Christmas!” is a SpongeBob SquarePantsepisode from season eight. In this episode, Plankton turns everybody in Bikini Bottom naughty by feeding them his special Jerktonium fruitcakes all in an effort to get his Christmas wish. (Spongebob Wikia)

Christmas Who?
Christmas Who?” is a SpongeBob SquarePants episode from season two. In this episode, Sandy tells SpongeBobabout Christmas traditions, and he then tells everybody in Bikini Bottom about Christmas. (Spongebob Wikia)

Christmas- Themed Episodes of the Simpsons

A Christmas Story
Ralphie has to convince his parents, his teacher, and Santa that a Red Ryder B.B. gun really is the perfect gift for the 1940s. (IMDB)

National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation
The Griswold family’s plans for a big family Christmas predictably turn into a big disaster. (IMDB)

Home Alone
An 8-year old troublemaker must protect his home from a pair of burglars when he is accidentally left home alone by his family during Christmas vacation. (IMDB)


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Great Summer Board Games

It’s summer! That means the kids are off and they’re already bored. You try taking them to the park, but it gets hot so quickly. You take them to the pool, but that gets old after a few days. What else is there to do when kids, grandkids, nieces, nephews, neighbors come over? It’s time to pull out the board games! There are so many, which one is just right? We’ll go through some great games for families, some for seniors, and some just for kids. Hopefully you find one that will keep your family occupied, even if just for a few hours.

Family Board Games
You went to visit family, or they came to you. Sometimes it’s hard to decide on something everyone can enjoy. Board games are great for all ages. Here are a few that are fun for adults and kids alike.

Life
If only life was like a board game. In Life, you go through the typical life stages: teen, adult, old age. Throughout, you experience highs and lows. Some will end up with a mansion, great job, and family. Others may end up in a shack, with a lousy job, and too many kids. Spin the wheel of Life and see where you end up.
Players: 2-6
Age range: 9 to adult
Playing time: About 45 mins.

Clue
Everyone knows Clue! It’s the game where you try to find the perpetrator of a murder. Everyone gets a character to play and people try to guess who the murderer is. It’s a fun “whodunit” type game for the family.
Players: 2-6 or 3-6
Age range: 8 to adult
Playing time: 15-60 minutes

Adult Games

Trivial Pursuit
Think you’re a knowitall? Test your knowledge of all things from pop culture to science to history. Trivial Pursuit has been around a while, but it’s still a fun group game.
Players: 2-6
Age range: 15 and up
Playing time: Varies

Taboo
This game is fun with older children and adults. You have a partner or teammates, and one person picks up a card. That person must try to get their partners to guess the word. But this is where it gets tricky. The cards have taboo words that you can’t say. For instance, the word is Fourth of July, the taboo words may be Independence Day, BBQ, grilling, summer, hot dogs, hamburgers. It gets hard, so you have to be creative.
Players: 4 +
Age range: 12 and up
Playing time: 10-30 minutes


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Calculating the Cost of Home Care Infographic

Delivering care to an ill or elderly loved one in their own home ensures their safety, preserves their independence and accommodates hardworking families who are unable to personally address all of their loved one’s needs. As a result, more families are finding that home care is the option their loved ones prefer and their budgets support.

At Just Like Family Home Care, we take pride in aligning the right star with each clients personalized preferences. We believe it is important, as a Naples home health care company, to maintain our clients lifestyle in the comfort of their home, hospital or facility.

Calculating the cist of at home care


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Kelly Dillaha joins Just Like Family Home Care

Kelly JLFJust Like Family Home Care, a family-owned and operated home care company servicing seven Southwest Florida counties, has announced that Kelly Dillaha joined the firm as a the Community Relations Representative for Lee County.

Dillaha previously spent three and a half years at Scotlynn USA Division Inc. in Fort Myers working as an Office Manager, Accountant and HR Manager. Previously she spent time as a Child Protective Investigator for the Florida Department of Children and Families. Dillaha graduated from Mariner High School in Cape Coral before receiving her bachelor’s degree in Business Management from Florida Gulf Coast University.

Just Like Family Home Care owner Elisabeth Nassberg says, “Kelly portrays every quality we desire in our employees at Just Like Family Home Care. The combination of her work history and outgoing personality will make her a great fit at Just Like Family Home Care. I am confident that she will represent our company well in the Lee County area.” Nassberg and Dillaha met last year on the Love That Dress! 2013 in Collier County, and both are passionate about supporting local charities in Collier and Lee Counties.

Just Like Family Home Care is a personalized home care company dedicated to caring for its customer’s loved ones with an easy, professional and loving dedication to their clients. “I am beyond thrilled to join the Just Like Family team. I am excited that this new opportunity allows me to be out in the community that I grew up in,” says Dillaha. “Plus, JLF is one big family and it already feels like I am a part of it.”

In her free time, Dillaha enjoys dance, Zumba, going to the gym and spending time with her husband. Dillaha is currently the Silent Auction Chair for the 2014 Love That Dress! in Collier County.

 


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Spring Cleaning!

Spring “sprung” back on March 20, but it doesn’t really start feeling like the season until April comes around.  Once it’s April, you can really feel the change in the air (and the air finally getting above freezing up north!).  Spring brings spring rain, spring flowers, and, of course, spring cleaning!  It’s a great idea to clean out the old living space once a year, and make certain you aren’t drowning in superfluous flotsam.  When you’re older, it can be very easy to let decades’ worth of living take over your home, and be lacking the physical capabilities to do something about it.  You may not even be able to keep up with simple housecleaning chores throughout the year because of poor health or mobility, making that annual purge all the more important.

So, where do you even start?  And how do you stay safe while you clean?

Make a List

The first thing to do is make a list for yourself of what you’re going to be cleaning, so you can keep it all straight and make sure you get to everything you want to.  Doubly important is a list of safety tasks to make sure you’re keeping yourself safe while you clean, like making certain hallways are clear of clutter that you could trip over, getting rid of expired food or medications, and making certain bulbs in lights and batteries in smoke/carbon monoxide detectors are up to snuff.

Get a Crew Together

Once you know what you’re going to be cleaning, don’t try to do it alone!  Get your friends and family to help you.  Not only will this make it take less time, it’ll make the effort far safer, and far more fun.  Don’t overexert yourself, and never lift heavy objects on your own!  And remember, you’re never alone: many retirement communities even have “cleaning clubs” to take care of these sorts of things as a community.

Make it a Party

Use this opportunity to be social and make stronger connections with your loved ones.  Cook for everyone and play bouncy music while you work to help pass the time and make the affair a positive experience for everyone.

Start with the Piles

Are there piles of clutter in your home?  Start there!   Organize those large piles first, don’t just go around them.  You can’t very well be sweeping the floor with piles of magazines and knickknacks in the way!

Don’t be Afraid to Trash

It can be hard to let go of some things, but you should always be ready for the future.  Use this opportunity to throw away now-useless items that are just taking up space.  This will reduce dangerous clutter, and also get you ready in case you have to move to a smaller home in the future.  If you can’t bring yourself to throw away something, but know, in your heart, you don’t need it, give it to a loved one for safekeeping instead.

Don’t Ignore the Details

Scrub and polish every surface, and sweep every floor.  Make sure there’s nothing left that could cause a fall in the future, and cover any potentially slippery surfaces with a rug.

Double Check Before you Finish

Before you wrap up the cleaning, double-check those bulbs and batteries, and make a note of anything you need, like new medications, replenished emergency supplies, fire extinguishers, and lists of emergency contacts.  Don’t just clean, make sure you’re prepared.


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Happy Holidays from Just Like Family

Tonight is the first night of Hanukkah, tomorrow is Thanksgiving, and Christmas and New Year’s are just around the corner!  It’s one of our favorite times of year, full of family, friends, food and happy memories.  So, from our family to yours, we have just one thing to say:

Happy Holidays!Happy holidays, everyone!


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The Age-Friendly Thanksgiving

With Thanksgiving nearly here, we wanted to share this lovely set of tips for hosting an all-ages-inclusive Thanksgiving dinner that we found floating on the Internet.  They were originally posted here on the eCaring blog, and were written last year by Melody Wilding.  Remember, it can be hectic to work out getting family from far flung locations together in one place, preparing an enormous meal, and making sure everyone is comfortable and having fun, especially the elderly or infirm members of the family.  We want you to have all the help you can get!

Woman with turkey

Tips for Hosting an Age-friendly Thanksgiving Dinner

By: Melody Wilding

Between coordinating travel plans, cooking, cleaning, and throwing a cast of personalities into one room, anxieties can run high around Turkey Day. If you are entertaining a mixed age group this year, respecting the eldest guests should also be high on your list.

How can you host a Thanksgiving dinner that accommodates the unique health and physical needs of elderly relatives and friends? Creating an age-friendly Thanksgiving dinner is simple with some forethought, planning, and communication.

Here are ways to ensure it is a happy holiday meal for young and old alike:

  • Be mindful of seating arrangements – If your aging parent or grandparent has physical limitations, seat him or hear at the end of the table, providing ample room to get up easily and more often without disrupting others.
  • Review the floor plan – Run through your home’s layout to make sure it is safe and free of any hazards that could cause a fall. Add additional lighting, secure carpets, and reduce any clutter in walkways. If your elderly loved one has a walker, wheelchair, or medical equipment (such as an oxygen tank), ensure that passageways have enough room to accommodate. Going out for dinner? Visit the restaurant beforehand to see if there are many stairs, tight spaces, or other conditions that would make it difficult for your aging relative to navigate safely.
  • Ask about dietary requirements – Begin planning your dinner menu in advance by asking your loved one and consulting his or her medical provider for dietary guidelines. For diabetics or persons with chronic conditions such as congestive heart failure, special diets such as low salt, low sugar, or low fat must be adhered to. If your loved one has suffered a stroke or otherwise has trouble swallowing, consider including a soft food dish in your menu.
  • Strike up conversation – Do not make the mistake of making your loved one feel invisible at Thanksgiving dinnertime. Many falsely assume that seniors are cranky and uninterested in chatting. However, the communal, family-feel of Thanksgiving is the perfect time for aging loved ones to share stories and lessons. As host, help encourage intergenerational communication by making children, teens, and older adults comfortable and meaningful, rather than awkward.
  • Enlist help – Consider hiring in-home respite care services to support caregiving duties around Thanksgiving crunch-time. This person can provide assistance with personal care, such as feeding, as well as companionship and stimulation. If your aging parent of grandparent has a home health aide, invite the caregiver to share dinner with you. Knowing your loved one has the help they need within range will bring comfort and peace of mind.
  • Acknowledge the person’s pace – Persons with dementia become uncomfortable and fearful in situations filled with noise and action. If your loved one has Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, find a peaceful place him or her to rest before the event begins to help ease the transition. Keep the volume of music and conversation even and fairly low. If being around many people or at a restaurant is too stressful of physically impossible, improvise! Plan family visits throughout the day to cover all meals shifts – breakfast, lunch, or dinner – or ask small groups of family members to visit with the person on alternate days before or after the Thanksgiving holiday.