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Alzheimer’s Disease: Do you know all the facts?

Over 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, and as many as 16 million will have the disease in 2050. The cost of caring for those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is estimated to total $214 billion in 2014, increasing to $1.2 trillion (in today’s dollars) by mid-century. Nearly one in every three seniors who dies each year has Alzheimer’s or another dementia.

Have you ever wondered about Alzheimer’s Disease? Does it run in your family? Do you know all the facts about this disease?

Here are some quick facts according alz.org:

  • More than 5 million Americans are living with the disease
  • Every 67 seconds someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s
  • Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States
  • There are approximately 500,000 people dying each year because they have Alzheimer’s
  • 1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another dementia
  • In 2013, 15.5 million caregivers provided an estimated 17.7 billion hours of unpaid care valued at more than $220 billion

Alzheimer’s statistics for Florida 

Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common form of dementia which is a progressive brain disease. If you are over 65 years of age you should know all the facts of Alzheimer’s. This disease slowly attacks nerve cells in all parts of the cortex of the brain. There are three brain abnormalities that are indicators of the Alzheimer’s disease process. The first indicator is plaques which is a protein that accumulates and forms sticky clumps between nerve cells. This will impact your memory and learning process. The second indicator is tangles which are damaged remains of the support structure that allows the flow of nutrients through the neurons. The last indicator is the loss of nerve cell connections. This process is the combination effect of the tangles and plaques that causes nerves to die off which in turn causes your brain tissue to shrink.

Memory Loss Myths & Facts

Now that you have a little insight on what Alzheimer’s disease is, there are some early symptoms that can be warnings signs to pay attention to: forgetfulness, loss of concentration, language problems, confusion about time and place, impaired judgment, loss of insight, impaired movement and coordination, mood and behavior changes, and apathy and depression. If you or a loved one feels like you have one or more of these symptoms please contact your doctor.

Know the 10 Early Signs & Symptoms of Alzheimer’s

Those that are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s have a tough choice to make. They can either choose to receive care at home from a caregiver or receive care at a nursing home. This decision can effect many of your loved ones and you should know the facts about each one.

Receiving care from a home caregiver is the first choice for most patients with Alzheimer’s disease. About 80% of patients receive care at home by family members. There are also options for patients to receive care from a home health aide. Home care can cause a tremendous amount of stress and impact on the quality of life on family members. It is very important to make sure that family members receive the right support services.

Receiving care from a nursing home is normally the second choice for most patients with Alzheimer’s. Many of the patients who end up in a nursing home are at the point where the home caregiver is no longer able to care of them. It is very important to find the right nursing home that will offer the correct services for Alzheimer’s.

When faced with Alzheimer’s remember that you are never alone and that there are ways to help you cope with the disease.

For more information and resources, visit http://www.alz.org 


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Calculating the Cost of Home Care Infographic

Delivering care to an ill or elderly loved one in their own home ensures their safety, preserves their independence and accommodates hardworking families who are unable to personally address all of their loved one’s needs. As a result, more families are finding that home care is the option their loved ones prefer and their budgets support.

At Just Like Family Home Care, we take pride in aligning the right star with each clients personalized preferences. We believe it is important, as a Naples home health care company, to maintain our clients lifestyle in the comfort of their home, hospital or facility.

Calculating the cist of at home care


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Keeping Seniors Safe in the Summer Sun

BA65396It’s summertime in Naples, Florida and we all know the scenic views come with the price of overwhelming rays from the powerful sun. At Just Like Family Home Care we want to ensure safety in the warm weather! The heat makes summer a dangerous season for everyone, but seniors are at a higher risk of suffering complications from the heat.

Most people don’t realize it, but according to the Huffington Post, extreme summer heat causes thousands of heat-related illnesses in the U.S. each year, and kills more people than hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, floods and earthquakes combined. Seniors are among the most vulnerable.

Many seniors take medications that could dehydrate them or make them more sensitive to the sun. Bodies of older adults also contain far less water than a younger person’s, and older brains don’t recognize thirst as easily, making them more likely to get dehydrated. For seniors who are not as mobile or depend on others to come by to care for them, they may not be able to move themselves to a cooler spot or help themselves if they start feeling heat-sick when they’re by themselves.

There are two main types of heat conditions: heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Both are categorized by dizziness, rapid or weak pulse, bright red skin, clamminess, and spots on the eyes. Both these conditions can cause the body temperature to get upwards toward 103 degrees.

In addition, many seniors have certain health problems that can increase their risk of hyperthermia (when the body overheats). These include:

• Underlying diseases like congestive heart failure, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD.
• Trouble walking or moving around.
• Being overweight.
• Having dementia or other problems with thinking skills.

Suggestions to keep seniors cooler:

  • Wear light colored or loose clothing
  • Use sunscreen, even if going outside for just a short period of time
  • Wear a hat that is wide-brimmed to protect the face (but isn’t so tight as to prevent ventilation)
  • Stay hydrated with water or other non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated drinks
  • Keep a spray bottle with cool water nearby to lightly spritz the face and body
  • A shady spot outdoors may be cooler than inside, so sitting on a covered porch with a portable or ceiling fan may be a good option
  • If you are inside with no AC, stay on the lower floor of your residence (which is typically cooler)
  • Mobile seniors should try to spend a few hours each day in a place with A/C: either a mall, library, a movie, or restaurant

At Just Like Family Home Care, we wish you a safe and COOL summer!


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11 Reasons Why Seniors Should Care About Social Media

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At Just Like Family Home care we are affected by the ever-changing world of social media on the Internet. Sites such as, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest used to be a “young mans game.” However, the demographic in our society is changing drastically: 1 in every 4 people over the age of 65 is on a social media site. With technological advances happening everyday, we at Just Like Family Home care feel it is vital for seniors to be a part of social media. Behold 11 benefits to seniors being on social media:

1) Keep in Touch 

Social Media is an incredible tool for keeping in touch with others. Not only can seniors keep in touch with their kids and grandkids, but seniors are finding their best friends from high school, college roommates and old elementary school crushes. Social media allows us to read blog posts, view pictures and videos, and have conversations with people we never thought we’d see again.

2) Research 

Seniors use social media tools to learn more about topics that interest them. In some cases it can lead them to cultivate hobbies and business ideas, and in other cases, such as with all the inaccurate health information available, it can be a confusing mix of resources. However, the Internet is enabling the over 50 crowd to learn more about new products, work on their genecology, and learn something new.

3)  Ask questions

I don’t know about you, but I get frustrated navigating the phone menu to nowhere, and so do so many others. By using the online tools available, many senior citizens can reach out via Twitter, Facebook, videos, blogs and live chats. Being able to talk to representatives and have all their questions answered, without being intimidated by voices, attitudes and a phone menu that doesn’t seem to lead anywhere, gives folks more confidence in a product.

4) Entertainment
Senior citizens can watch old television shows and movies, as well as find videos from “back in the day.” They can read ebooks, articles and blog posts, find song lyrics and find out what their favorite entertainers are up to. They can play games, either by themselves or with family and friends. Shut ins or those who can’t get out and around as well as they used to no longer have to feel lonely when they’re home alone.

5) Start a new business
Being online allows folks of all ages to start a new business. Perhaps they can sell crafts or give coaching advice. Or maybe they want to get into freelance writing or some sort of consulting. Many senior citizens would love to work but companies don’t want to hire them as they feel they’re “too old.” With social media and so many online productivity and networking tools, senior citizens no longer have to be forced into retirement.

6) Grow an existing business
Seniors who are still in business need to keep up with new programs and technologies. Social media enables them to stay in the game and compete with younger businesses. Use social media tools to connect and share. Answer questions, promote events and sales and more.

7) Learn
Just because one is retired or out of school doesn’t necessarily mean one wants to stop learning. Seniors are now taking courses online and reading online books, posts, articles and more to keep their minds active. Because seniors are now better able to keep up with emerging technologies, they don’t have to be considered “old and out of touch” and can hold their own in a conversation.

8) Share
Senior citizens aren’t merely people who are older than us. They’re also people who have been in the trenches. They have amazing stories and brilliant ideas. Through social media they can share all that good stuff with others. Seniors can blog about how life was when they were growing up or how things have changed during their lifetime. They network online and offer advices and mentoring to younger people and students and they can start Facebook pages to talk to others their age.

9) Meet others
The social networks allow us to meet others, for both business and pleasure. From online meetings seniors can plan offline meetups and networking events with like minded people and people their age.

10) Find work
65 is no longer the age of retirement for active seniors. Many would like to continue working, if not full time with an established business, they can also consult and freelance. Various networks enable them to find opportunities, post online resumes and view and apply for job listings.

11) Take advantage of sales and online opportunities

By following their favorite businesses and brands, seniors can save money by taking advantage of promotional opportunities. Many times freebies and discounts are only available via a Facebook page or for Twitter followers.

For more information on places to get “social media training” call Just Like Family Home Care at 239. 431.6661


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Celebrating our Seniors

This May we are celebrating Senior Citizens at Just Like Family Home Care as May is Senior Citizens Month. The history of Senior Citizens Month goes back half of a century.

According to the Administration on Aging, when Older Americans Month was established in 1963, only 17 million living Americans had reached their 65th birthdays. About a third of older Americans lived in poverty and there were few programs to meet their needs. Interest in older Americans and their concerns was growing, however. In April of 1963, President John F. Kennedy’s meeting with the National Council of Senior Citizens served as a prelude to designating May as “Senior Citizens Month.”

Thanks to President Jimmy Carter’s 1980 designation, what was once called Senior Citizens Month, is now called “Older Americans Month,” and has become a tradition.

Historically, Older Americans Month has been a time to acknowledge the contributions of past and current older persons to our country, in particular those who defended our country. Every President since JFK has issued a formal proclamation during or before the month ofMay asking that the entire nation pay tribute in some way to older persons in their communities. Older Americans Month is celebrated across the Coun
try through ceremonies, events, fairs and other such activities.

The older population–persons 65 years or older–numbered 39.6 million in 2009 (the latest year for which data is available). They represented 12.9% of the U.S. population, about one in every eight Americans. By 2030, there will be about 72.1 million older persons, more than twice their number in 2000. People 65+ represented 12.4% of the population in the year 2000 but are expected to grow to be 19% of the population by 2030. 

At Just Like FamiImagely, we see the growth first hand and we know many of our local Seniors are in need of more than just caregivers. They need everyday toiletries, clothing, cards and more. Join us Wednesday May 14 from 5-7:30 p.m. for a Celebrity Bartender Night at Noodles Italian Cafe & Sushi Bar in Naples to celebrate Senior Citizens Month. A $20 donation at the door will provide you with a drink ticket and food.

 


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Mapping Aging (Again)

Not too long ago, we poured over some really interesting maps about aging trends in the United States.  Those maps showed county-by-county trends, and essentially brought us to the conclusion that we are slowly aging as a country, especially in Florida, and less-so in the Mountain West.  But how do we stack up against the rest of the world?  The answer says a lot about where we’re going as a country.

Here’s the median age in each state as of 2010.

0YJXFYeJust like before, the trends are obvious.  Older, more developed Northeastern states are more aged, the rugged, relatively unpopulated Mountain West is younger, and New England, Pennsylvania and Florida are the oldest areas in the country.  Let’s parse this down further, and look at a big county-by-county map.

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It’s very interesting to see it this way.  The county maps from last time showed trends into the future, this map shows the age of each county right now.  It’s very unexpected that Maine is the overall oldest state by median age, though!  But less surprising is the presence of the country’s oldest county, Sumter County, in Florida.

Now, let’s look at trends for the entire world, with the under 30 percentage in each country in 2005, and the projection of the same in 2025…

world_age_structure_2005_2025It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see where the shift is occurring there.  The more “developed” countries are getting older, while the less “developed” countries are getting younger as their populations explode.  The reasons are pretty easy to guess: easy access to birth control in the “Developed World” alongside far greater longevity and more comprehensive healthcare services in those countries letting more people live longer.  The areas of the world that are healthiest are understandably becoming the oldest!

Let’s take a look at two specific examples to make this more clear…

1280px-Australian_Census_2011_demographic_map_-_Australia_by_SLA_-_BCP_field_0109_Median_age_of_persons.svg

This is the average age in each Australian Land District.  Australia is a country very similar to the United States, with a colonial heritage derived from the British Empire that started on a vast, untamed continent, with an even more untamed West and interior.  The main differences are that the country is younger, and that the continent in question is a bit more inhospitable than North America was (to put it mildly).  The demographics reflect that, with a pattern similar to the United States’, but more extreme.  The giant Great Victoria and Gibson Deserts have extremely young populations, just like the American Mountain West and Alaska do, as does the relatively unpopulated Northern Territory.  The older, major coastal cities and their sprawls, Gold Coast, Brisbane, Newcastle, Sydney, Canberra, and Melbourne, make a line along the country’s southeast coast that fills the area with an older population, just like the American Northeast Corridor.  Additional splotches of red surround the other large cities, Adelaide and Perth.  You can see the trends developing that in a few more decades will make Australia’s age map will look a lot like ours does now as the continent fills-in with more people,.  So this is where we were around 50 years ago.  Where will we be 50 years from now?

Let’s look to an unlikely place for the future…

Naselja-median_starostiWeren’t expecting that, were you?  Croatia is a prime example of where the US is going in regards to aging, as it’s a very developed European country, but not as extreme an example as countries in Western and Northern Europe, thanks mostly to the relatively recent wars in the region.  As you can see, even the youngest areas bottom out at an average of around 35 years, with huge swaths of the country averaging in the mid-50s in age.  This is where we are going, as our health improves, and our lives get longer, and our birth rate slows.  Essentially, while we still think of ourselves in terms of our cultural and political competitors, like Russia, China and Brazil, we’re actually slowly turning into the United Kingdom and Japan in terms of demographics.  It will be extremely interesting to see how that affects our character as a country moving forward.


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The Greyist Cities

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A recent trivia question we posted on our Facebook page about the “greyest” country in the world, Monaco, got us thinking about what the most elderly-friendly cities in the United States are, with the largest percentage of senior citizens, and what attracts them there, like mild temperatures and recreation options (like golf and beaches).  It’s obviously an interesting topic to us!  Well, thanks to Business InsiderRetirementhomes.com and Golflink.com, we have the numbers right here, and, sure enough, our own Naples is on the list!

NATIONAL AVERAGE
Senior citizens: 12.9%
Average temperature in November: 63°F
Golf courses: 6.5 per 100K
Retirement homes: 9.1 per 100K

#13 – HOT SPRINGS, AK
Senior citizens: 20.8%
Average temperature in November: 63°F
Golf courses: 62 per 100K
Retirement homes: 34 per 100K

#12 – OCEAN CITY, NJ
Senior citizens: 20.9%
Average temperature in November: 56°F
Golf courses: 204 per 100K
Retirement homes: 7 per 100K

#11 – LAKE HAVASU CITY, AZ
Senior citizens: 21.1%
Average temperature in November: 74°F
Golf courses: 11 per 100K
Retirement homes: 18 per 100K

#10 – PORT SAINT LUCIE, FL
Senior citizens: 22.1%
Average temperature in November: 80°F
Golf courses: 40 per 100K
Retirement homes: 5 per 100K

#9 – CAPE CORAL, FL
Senior citizens: 22.5%
Average temperature in November: 81°F
Golf courses: 57 per 100K
Retirement homes: 5 per 100K

#8 – PRESCOTT, AZ
Senior citizens: 22.6%
Average temperature in November: 60°F
Golf courses: 20 per 100K
Retirement homes: 39 per 100K

#7 – BARNSTABLE, MA
Senior citizens: 23.6%
Average temperature in November: 51°F
Golf courses: 17 per 100K
Retirement homes: 4 per 100K

#6 – PALM COAST, FL
Senior citizens: 24.2%
Average temperature in November: 76°F
Golf courses: 61 per 100K
Retirement homes: 21 per 100K

#5 – OCALA, FL
Senior citizens: 24.2%
Average temperature in November: 77°F
Golf courses: 135 per 100K
Retirement homes: 42 per 100K

#4 – VERO BEACH, FL
Senior citizens: 25.5%
Average temperature in November: 79°F
Golf courses: 187 per 100K
Retirement homes: 99 per 100K

#3 NAPLES, FL
Senior citizens: 25.5%
Average temperature in November: 82°F
Golf courses: 545 per 100K
Retirement homes: 80 per 100K

#2 BRADENTON, FL
Senior citizens: 26.5%
Average temperature in November: 80°F
Golf courses: 159 per 100K
Retirement homes: 65 per 100K

#1 – PUNTA GORDA, FL
Senior citizens: 30.5%
Average temperature in November: 81°F
Golf courses: 348 per 100K
Retirement homes: 98 per 100K