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10 Best Nursing Blogs

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No matter the profession you are in, you likely have sought out a community, hub, or resources online. As a nurse, you are in luck! There are tons of websites out there for you to connect with fellow nurses, read more about the profession, learn new things, have a laugh, and just be in good company. There are websites for nurses in general as well as sites for specific types of nurses like ER or pediatric.

Just a quick google search and you can find tons of blogs and sites for nurses and nursing students. Here are a few of our favorites that we would like to share.

Reddit.com/nursing
This community currently has 26,000 subscribers and is quite active. You will find posts on everything related to nursing and can post items yourself.

Nurse Eye Roll
For when you need a laugh

Nurse Buff
This humor and lifestyle blog is just what the Doctor ordered. There are tons of blog posts ranging from life hacks to funny quotes and more.

Scrubs
This is similar to NurseBuff as they are all about the nursing lifestyle. They are a magazine and have plenty of content to go through. Examples include “10 Ways to Keep Your Nursing New year’s Resolutions” and “5 Things Nurses Can’t Live Without in 2016”.

School of Nursing Blog | Rasmussen College
This is the perfect blog for the nursing school student or the nurse who can never know enough!

Evidenced-Based Nursing Blog
This nursing blog comes from the Evidence Based Nursing Journal. For the nurse who loves research.

Nurse Code
This nursing blog covers everything from funny images to “nurse problems” to inspiration.

Off the Charts
This blog comes from the American Journal of Nursing. Lots of trends in nursing to keep up with.

Nursetopia
“A random stream of consciousness about nursing and the world we impact”.

The Nurse Teacher
This blog is run by a nurse who is involved in clinical teaching. They give tips and personal anecdotes.


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Driving for Seniors

imagesAre you or a loved one starting to feel the effects of aging? The aging process can have an effect on your driving skills. There are no age limits for older drivers, but it is recommended to get your eyesight tested, be certain your loved ones aren’t worried about your driving, and make sure driving doesn’t make you nervous or overwhelmed.
All of these concerns should be taken into account when you consider whether or not to give up your ability to drive. It may seem hard to give up that independence, but the safety of yourself and other drivers and pedestrians needs to be taken into consideration.
Eyesight
Have you noticed it is difficult to read signs? Is the headlight glare at night bothersome? Are you able to properly navigate at night? Be certain that your seat is high enough so you can see over the steering wheel. If you wear glasses, make sure the prescription is up to date and get prescription sunglasses if needed. It is also recommended if you are over 60 to visit the eye doctor each year.
Control of the Vehicle
Be certain you are able to physically control the vehicle. Is it difficult to look over your should when you change lanes? Is walking a concern? Do you get pain or out of breath walking up or down stairs? Answering yes to any of these questions should prompt you to consult your doctor. Be sure when you drive that you are comfortable, that mirrors and your seat are in the proper positions so you can see.
Feel Safe Driving
Have you had any dizzy spells recently? Has your vision become blurry? Be sure to wait a while before driving, or have a friend drive you if you have been feeling dizzy. If you recently took medicine it may cause you to become fatigued, so it is best if you do not drive right after. Try to avoid driving during busy times of the day, plan your outings for during the day.
Loved Ones Concerned
If your loved ones have expressed concerns over your driving it may be a good idea to enroll in a mature driving class. These are offered by AAA and AARP. It is also smart to give your loved ones a call or text when you plan to go out and when you return home, so they know you are safe. If it becomes a major concern, ask them to provide rides for you or set up rides with a transport service.
If you ever need a ride to a doctors appointment, event or you just need help running errands, call Just Like Family Concierge Transport Services 


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Alzheimer’s Disease: Do you know all the facts?

Over 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, and as many as 16 million will have the disease in 2050. The cost of caring for those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is estimated to total $214 billion in 2014, increasing to $1.2 trillion (in today’s dollars) by mid-century. Nearly one in every three seniors who dies each year has Alzheimer’s or another dementia.

Have you ever wondered about Alzheimer’s Disease? Does it run in your family? Do you know all the facts about this disease?

Here are some quick facts according alz.org:

  • More than 5 million Americans are living with the disease
  • Every 67 seconds someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s
  • Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States
  • There are approximately 500,000 people dying each year because they have Alzheimer’s
  • 1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another dementia
  • In 2013, 15.5 million caregivers provided an estimated 17.7 billion hours of unpaid care valued at more than $220 billion

Alzheimer’s statistics for Florida 

Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common form of dementia which is a progressive brain disease. If you are over 65 years of age you should know all the facts of Alzheimer’s. This disease slowly attacks nerve cells in all parts of the cortex of the brain. There are three brain abnormalities that are indicators of the Alzheimer’s disease process. The first indicator is plaques which is a protein that accumulates and forms sticky clumps between nerve cells. This will impact your memory and learning process. The second indicator is tangles which are damaged remains of the support structure that allows the flow of nutrients through the neurons. The last indicator is the loss of nerve cell connections. This process is the combination effect of the tangles and plaques that causes nerves to die off which in turn causes your brain tissue to shrink.

Memory Loss Myths & Facts

Now that you have a little insight on what Alzheimer’s disease is, there are some early symptoms that can be warnings signs to pay attention to: forgetfulness, loss of concentration, language problems, confusion about time and place, impaired judgment, loss of insight, impaired movement and coordination, mood and behavior changes, and apathy and depression. If you or a loved one feels like you have one or more of these symptoms please contact your doctor.

Know the 10 Early Signs & Symptoms of Alzheimer’s

Those that are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s have a tough choice to make. They can either choose to receive care at home from a caregiver or receive care at a nursing home. This decision can effect many of your loved ones and you should know the facts about each one.

Receiving care from a home caregiver is the first choice for most patients with Alzheimer’s disease. About 80% of patients receive care at home by family members. There are also options for patients to receive care from a home health aide. Home care can cause a tremendous amount of stress and impact on the quality of life on family members. It is very important to make sure that family members receive the right support services.

Receiving care from a nursing home is normally the second choice for most patients with Alzheimer’s. Many of the patients who end up in a nursing home are at the point where the home caregiver is no longer able to care of them. It is very important to find the right nursing home that will offer the correct services for Alzheimer’s.

When faced with Alzheimer’s remember that you are never alone and that there are ways to help you cope with the disease.

For more information and resources, visit http://www.alz.org 


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11 Reasons Why Seniors Should Care About Social Media

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At Just Like Family Home care we are affected by the ever-changing world of social media on the Internet. Sites such as, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest used to be a “young mans game.” However, the demographic in our society is changing drastically: 1 in every 4 people over the age of 65 is on a social media site. With technological advances happening everyday, we at Just Like Family Home care feel it is vital for seniors to be a part of social media. Behold 11 benefits to seniors being on social media:

1) Keep in Touch 

Social Media is an incredible tool for keeping in touch with others. Not only can seniors keep in touch with their kids and grandkids, but seniors are finding their best friends from high school, college roommates and old elementary school crushes. Social media allows us to read blog posts, view pictures and videos, and have conversations with people we never thought we’d see again.

2) Research 

Seniors use social media tools to learn more about topics that interest them. In some cases it can lead them to cultivate hobbies and business ideas, and in other cases, such as with all the inaccurate health information available, it can be a confusing mix of resources. However, the Internet is enabling the over 50 crowd to learn more about new products, work on their genecology, and learn something new.

3)  Ask questions

I don’t know about you, but I get frustrated navigating the phone menu to nowhere, and so do so many others. By using the online tools available, many senior citizens can reach out via Twitter, Facebook, videos, blogs and live chats. Being able to talk to representatives and have all their questions answered, without being intimidated by voices, attitudes and a phone menu that doesn’t seem to lead anywhere, gives folks more confidence in a product.

4) Entertainment
Senior citizens can watch old television shows and movies, as well as find videos from “back in the day.” They can read ebooks, articles and blog posts, find song lyrics and find out what their favorite entertainers are up to. They can play games, either by themselves or with family and friends. Shut ins or those who can’t get out and around as well as they used to no longer have to feel lonely when they’re home alone.

5) Start a new business
Being online allows folks of all ages to start a new business. Perhaps they can sell crafts or give coaching advice. Or maybe they want to get into freelance writing or some sort of consulting. Many senior citizens would love to work but companies don’t want to hire them as they feel they’re “too old.” With social media and so many online productivity and networking tools, senior citizens no longer have to be forced into retirement.

6) Grow an existing business
Seniors who are still in business need to keep up with new programs and technologies. Social media enables them to stay in the game and compete with younger businesses. Use social media tools to connect and share. Answer questions, promote events and sales and more.

7) Learn
Just because one is retired or out of school doesn’t necessarily mean one wants to stop learning. Seniors are now taking courses online and reading online books, posts, articles and more to keep their minds active. Because seniors are now better able to keep up with emerging technologies, they don’t have to be considered “old and out of touch” and can hold their own in a conversation.

8) Share
Senior citizens aren’t merely people who are older than us. They’re also people who have been in the trenches. They have amazing stories and brilliant ideas. Through social media they can share all that good stuff with others. Seniors can blog about how life was when they were growing up or how things have changed during their lifetime. They network online and offer advices and mentoring to younger people and students and they can start Facebook pages to talk to others their age.

9) Meet others
The social networks allow us to meet others, for both business and pleasure. From online meetings seniors can plan offline meetups and networking events with like minded people and people their age.

10) Find work
65 is no longer the age of retirement for active seniors. Many would like to continue working, if not full time with an established business, they can also consult and freelance. Various networks enable them to find opportunities, post online resumes and view and apply for job listings.

11) Take advantage of sales and online opportunities

By following their favorite businesses and brands, seniors can save money by taking advantage of promotional opportunities. Many times freebies and discounts are only available via a Facebook page or for Twitter followers.

For more information on places to get “social media training” call Just Like Family Home Care at 239. 431.6661


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Senior Month, Senior Drive

Help Just Like Family collect NEW items for our Seniors in Need

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May is just around the corner and that means it is time for Just Like Family Home Care’s 2nd annual Senior Collection Drive. Join JLF as we celebrate Senior Citizens in My. During the month of May through June we are collecting NEW items to distribute to Seniors in need in Southwest Florida.Last year the drive was a huge success because of our partners’ generosity and support. We ask that you participate this year by helping us collect as much as we can for our Seniors. In June, items will be distributed to St. Matthews House and Goodlette Arms. I talked to a spokesperson with St. Matthews House earlier this week and I am told the summer months are when they’re in the most need. People are so generous around the holidays, but our hope is that this Senior Drive will spark giving year round. Last year we donated more than 50 boxes worth of items and I am confident we can surpass that this time around!

How can you help? Create your own Senior Collection Drive. We have marketing materials and custom boxes available.

Suggested Items include:

  • Soap
  • Shower Gel
  • Shampoo
  • Conditioner
  • Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste
  • Mouthwash
  • Razors
  • Deodorant
  • Chapstick
  • Lotion
  • Facial Tissues
  • Throat Drops
  • Laundry Detergent
  • Softener Sheets
  • Dish Soap
  • Dish Towels
  • Household Cleaners
  • Sweaters for Men or Women
  • Pajamas
  • Slippers
  • Undershirts for Men
  • Pajamas
  • Slippers
  • Undershirts for Men
  • Socks
  • Greeting Cards
  • Stamps
  • Crossword Puzzle Books
  • Puzzles
  • Books
  • Tea Bags
  • Coffee
  • Canned Goods
  • Bottled Water
  • Ensure
  • Reading Glasses
  • Sunglasses
  • Knitting Supplies
  • Deck of Cards
  • Calendars

When your box is filled, simply phone us at (239) 431-6661 and we will pick up your collection. Thank you for your help and support and we look forward to working with you in the coming months!


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The Age-Friendly Thanksgiving

With Thanksgiving nearly here, we wanted to share this lovely set of tips for hosting an all-ages-inclusive Thanksgiving dinner that we found floating on the Internet.  They were originally posted here on the eCaring blog, and were written last year by Melody Wilding.  Remember, it can be hectic to work out getting family from far flung locations together in one place, preparing an enormous meal, and making sure everyone is comfortable and having fun, especially the elderly or infirm members of the family.  We want you to have all the help you can get!

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Tips for Hosting an Age-friendly Thanksgiving Dinner

By: Melody Wilding

Between coordinating travel plans, cooking, cleaning, and throwing a cast of personalities into one room, anxieties can run high around Turkey Day. If you are entertaining a mixed age group this year, respecting the eldest guests should also be high on your list.

How can you host a Thanksgiving dinner that accommodates the unique health and physical needs of elderly relatives and friends? Creating an age-friendly Thanksgiving dinner is simple with some forethought, planning, and communication.

Here are ways to ensure it is a happy holiday meal for young and old alike:

  • Be mindful of seating arrangements – If your aging parent or grandparent has physical limitations, seat him or hear at the end of the table, providing ample room to get up easily and more often without disrupting others.
  • Review the floor plan – Run through your home’s layout to make sure it is safe and free of any hazards that could cause a fall. Add additional lighting, secure carpets, and reduce any clutter in walkways. If your elderly loved one has a walker, wheelchair, or medical equipment (such as an oxygen tank), ensure that passageways have enough room to accommodate. Going out for dinner? Visit the restaurant beforehand to see if there are many stairs, tight spaces, or other conditions that would make it difficult for your aging relative to navigate safely.
  • Ask about dietary requirements – Begin planning your dinner menu in advance by asking your loved one and consulting his or her medical provider for dietary guidelines. For diabetics or persons with chronic conditions such as congestive heart failure, special diets such as low salt, low sugar, or low fat must be adhered to. If your loved one has suffered a stroke or otherwise has trouble swallowing, consider including a soft food dish in your menu.
  • Strike up conversation – Do not make the mistake of making your loved one feel invisible at Thanksgiving dinnertime. Many falsely assume that seniors are cranky and uninterested in chatting. However, the communal, family-feel of Thanksgiving is the perfect time for aging loved ones to share stories and lessons. As host, help encourage intergenerational communication by making children, teens, and older adults comfortable and meaningful, rather than awkward.
  • Enlist help – Consider hiring in-home respite care services to support caregiving duties around Thanksgiving crunch-time. This person can provide assistance with personal care, such as feeding, as well as companionship and stimulation. If your aging parent of grandparent has a home health aide, invite the caregiver to share dinner with you. Knowing your loved one has the help they need within range will bring comfort and peace of mind.
  • Acknowledge the person’s pace – Persons with dementia become uncomfortable and fearful in situations filled with noise and action. If your loved one has Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, find a peaceful place him or her to rest before the event begins to help ease the transition. Keep the volume of music and conversation even and fairly low. If being around many people or at a restaurant is too stressful of physically impossible, improvise! Plan family visits throughout the day to cover all meals shifts – breakfast, lunch, or dinner – or ask small groups of family members to visit with the person on alternate days before or after the Thanksgiving holiday.


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Fashion Tips for Seniors

Staying fashionable as a senior citizen can be a struggle: how do you stay fashionable while looking age-appropriate?  How do you alter your fashion sense so that it respects your older sensibilities while embracing new fashion trends?  Well, we’re not fashion experts here at Just Like Family, but there are plenty of people out there who are.  Here are some examples of what we think is some very good advice to get you out there looking your best!

 

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