Leave a comment

How to make a beach trip safe for seniors

When you decide to live in Florida it’s most likely because you love the beach. You try to get out there as often as you can, and it never gets old! You can fish, swim, read a book, take a nap (under an umbrella with lots of sunscreen on!). The beach is a great way to enjoy the outdoors.

It’s a shame when you can’t take advantage of a beautiful sunny day. This is something many seniors must consider. The sun and sand are essential parts of the beach (what is a beach without them?). But those two elements make these areas dangerous for seniors and the elderly.

How can we make the beach safer for our senior friends and family members?

What to bring?

When you’re planning a trip to the beach with an elderly loved one, you will need a few extra items you might not normally bring. First of all, make sure they have on sneakers, loose fitting, light clothes to block the sun, and have on tons of sunscreen. Bring a hat and sunglasses to protect the face and eyes.

It’s a good idea to bring a cooler to keep water nice and cold all day long. Also, bring along a portable, battery-operated fan. These can be found at convenience stores and are a great way to provide a little breeze if there isn’t any that day.

Bring along enough food to last the time you will be there. Even an Ensure or other protein-filled drink is a good idea to provide maximum nutrients.

Battling the Sand

Before you can ever worry about what to do at the beach, you have to worry about actually walking onto it. The sand, for many of us, is just an uneven surface we plod through to get to our destination. For seniors, the sand can prove hazardous, especially for those that lack the mobility to get through it. Sand is difficult even for the fully able-bodied person.

How can you make it easier for seniors to get through the sand? First, pick a beach that will require as short a walk as possible. Don’t pick the beach where you have to trek a quarter of a mile in order to get away from the masses.

Next, make sure they are wearing sneakers. Nobody likes sand in their shoes, but sneakers will ensure that there aren’t any footwear issues.

Be sure to provide support as they walk. Have someone on either side helping them up just in case of any missteps.

The last way to solve this problem is to get a beach wheelchair (yes they’re a thing). Beach wheelchairs feature large wheels that are designed just for getting through sand. This is the safest way to get your loved one down to the beach.

Beating the Heat & Sun

As mentioned above, be sure your loved one is wearing the proper sun-protecting gear. This includes sunglasses, a wide-brimmed hat, loose fitting shirt and pants, and sneakers. If it is much too hot for long sleeves and pants, opt for shorts and a short-sleeve shirt.

You will also need an umbrella that they can comfortably sit under throughout the day. Every two hours you will need to reapply sunscreen to ensure it won’t wear off.

It probably isn’t a great idea to spend the next 6 hours at the beach. About 2 hours may be a good amount of time. Because as we age, our skin becomes more and more sensitive especially to the sunlight. We must be cautious of this when we plan trips to the beach.

 

There you have it! Some simple tips to help get your senior friends and family members out to the beach with you.


Leave a comment

Outdoor Activities in Southwest Florida

The kids are out of school and you’ve got to find something to do with them! Or maybe you don’t have kids and just want to get out to enjoy that summer sun. There are tons of summer activities for families, couples, and adventurous souls around Southwest Florida. Being in Florida, we have access to many unique environments that other people never get to see. We have swamps, estuaries, rookeries, and the like filled with unique native wildlife.

Take a trip this summer to one of these nearby areas to experience the wildlife, scenery, and take some great photos!

Conservancy

Via Conservancy of SWFL Facebook

The Conservancy of Southwest Florida
The Conservancy’s mission is protect our water, land, wildlife, and future. Come visit the Nature Center, or join an offsite program like their Eco Cruise, Nature Walks, and Fossil Digs.

Rookery Bay
Visit Rookery Bay for recreation (boating, kayaking, fishing) or to learn. There are guided nature tours or you can explore on your own. Take a look at their list of events to see what’s going on.

The Everglades
A bit further outside of the area, but worth the trip if you plan to kayak or go on an airboat tour. You’ll really feel how expansive The Everglades is when you get out in the middle of it.

Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens
Visit the Naples Zoo as a group or on your own. Check out their daily schedule to see what’s going on such as chances to Meet the Keepers, and special shows like Snakes Alive!

Big Cypress National Preserve
The Big Cypress Swamp helps support the Everglades with its freshwater. The Swamp is home to various wildlife like Florida panthers, as well as plant life. You can camp and go explore the Preserve at your own pace.

Corkscrew Swamp
This Swamp is located about 30 minutes east of Naples. It is home to hundreds of animals like alligators, white tailed deer, red bellied turtles, otters, and many types of birds. Bring your camera to take photos along the boardwalk trail.

sun n fun lagoon

Via Sun N Fun Lagoon website

Sun N Fun Lagoon Water Park
Sure, you can cool off at the community pool or the beach this summer. But why not spend a day slipping and slidding through the various water rides at Sun N Fun Lagoon? Relax on the Lazy River, do a few laps in the pool, show off your form in on the diving board, and slip down the many slides.


Leave a comment

The Ultimate Summer Reading Guide

pexels-photo (2)

There are always tons of articles out there about what to read over the summer. It seems like summer is the time for relaxing on the beach with a book in hand, so what will you be reading? If you don’t already have one, get a library card, and maybe even invest in a Kindle. Many libraries offer programs that allow you to check out Kindle books for free.

Now here is our list of Summer Book Lists….

This Summer’s 14 Must-Read Books
WIRED Magazine

  • Magic and Loss by Virginia Heffernan
  • Grunt by Mary Roach
  • Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi
  • You’ll Grow Out of It by Jessi Klein
  • The Girls by Emma Cline
  • ……

10 Books to Read This Summer
Entertainment Weekly

  • We Are Not Such Things by Justine Van Der Leun
  • The Wicked Boy by Kate Summerscale
  • The Hopefuls by Jennifer Close
  • ……

What We’re Reading With Our Kids This Summer
The New Yorker

  • Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type
  • The B.F.G by Roald Dahl
  • Harry Potter series
  • …..

31 Great Summer Books
Real Simple

  • Bloom: Finding Beauty in the Unexpected—A Memoir by Kelle Hampton
  • Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: (A Mostly True Memoir) by Jenny Lawson
  • My Name is Memory by Ann Brashares
  • The Dry Grass of August by Anna Jean Mayhew
  • …..

The Best Beach Reads for a Summer Getaway
Popsugar

  • The Vacationers by Emma Straub
  • Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  • The One & Only by Emily Griffin
  • …..

5 Books to Read This Summer
Bill Gates

  • Seveneves, by Neal Stephenson
  • How Not to be Wrong, by Jordan Ellenberg
  • The Vital Question, by Nick Lane
  • The Power to Compete, by Ryoichi Mikitani and Hiroshi Mikitani
  • Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by Noah Yuval Harari

 

19 Summer Books That Everyone Will Be Talking About
Elle

  • Some Possible Solutions by Helen Phillips
  • Rich and Pretty by Rumaan Alam
  • Marrow Island by Alexis Smith
  • Invincible Summer by Alice Adams
  • …..

There you have it! Everything from fiction to non-fiction, thrillers to science. Now you can’t complain about being bored this summer with all these great books to read. And if you plan to read them at the beach, be sure to check out our summer sun safety tips.


Leave a comment

Cooling Off Seniors

It’s extremely important to stay cool in the summer, especially here in Florida with our high heat and humidity. Heat is one of the leading causes of weather-related death in the US, causing hundreds each year (National Weather Service). This is especially true for children and older Americans. As we age, our bodies become less efficient, and we can’t regulate our body temperature as well. This alone makes keeping seniors cool a priority.

So how do we keep them cool? Well The Heritage at Lowman as a great article on how to keep seniors cool during summer. They have tips like adding fruit to water for added taste, to walk around an indoor mall if your home doesn’t have AC, and to dress in light colored, loose-fitting clothes.

Keeping Seniors Cool During Summer’s Heat
the Heritage at Lowman

According the National Weather Service, heat is one of the leading causes of weather-related death in the United States, causing hundreds of fatalities each year. Older adults are even more susceptible to the dangers of heat, as they are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Additionally, as we grow older, our bodies become less efficient at regulating body temperature. Seniors are also more likely to have a health condition or be taking medications that make it more difficult for the body to regulate its temperature or to perspire.

The importance of staying hydrated

Just as our sensitivity to heat dulls as we age, so does our awareness of thirst. This, along with our body’s decreased ability to conserve water as we grow older, puts seniors at greater risk of dehydration. Summer heat adds to the risk, because on hot days, the body loses water more quickly. Here are some tips for staying hydrated this summer:

  • Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to take in fluids. If you’re thirsty, you’re already dehydrated.
  • Avoid caffeine and alcohol, as these can cause the body to lose even more fluid.
  • Eat lots of fresh fruit, a wonderful source of fluids.
  • Add fresh lemon or lime to your water to add a little flavor.
  • Use water to dilute fruit juices, making them last longer and increasing your fluid intake.
  • Get creative! Make “mocktails,” like nonalcoholic daiquiris and piña coladas.

If you are on a fluid-restricted diet, consult your physician about how to get the fluids you need during the hot summer months.

Read more of the article on their website


Leave a comment

4 Delicious Summer Meals

Summer isn’t over just yet! You can enjoy a few outdoor family dinners. Bring the kids and pets and it’ll be a grand ol’ time. But don’t forget the food! Food is what brings us together at the table, something to talk over and about. So try these tasty summer dishes at your next dinner.

Sweet and Spicy Apple & Pecan Coleslaw
This comes to us from Mom Spark. It’s a new take on the refreshing coleslaw we’re all used to. The extra kick really gives it some flavor.

Cowboy Caviar
This is a great bbq recipe that doesn’t require a stove, oven or grill. It’s just some tasty beans, and veggies mixed and seasoned to perfection. It complements any grilled meat or fish, and also goes great with chips. (Via Party Bluprints Blog)

Grilled Hawaiian Teriyaki Burger
Know what makes something Hawaiian? Throwing a pineapple on it! And boy does it taste good! You’ll wonder why you never tried it before (Via Skinny Taste).

Buffalo Fries
Who doesn’t love a kick of buffalo sauce? It goes great on chicken, pizza, and fries. Mix in some refreshing blue cheese and you have an appetizers everyone will love. (Via Tidy Mom)


Leave a comment

Tasty Summer Drinks

Summer isn’t complete without a refreshing drink on a hot day. And nothing tastes better than a cup of something homemade. Maybe it’s lemonade or sweet tea, or something a little stronger. Take a look at these easy to make drink recipes to get you in the summer spirit (get it summer spirit?).

Easy Peach Tea
Passion For Savings has a great homemade tea recipe using delicious peaches, water sugar, and tea bags. Check out there site to see exactly how to make this sweet drink.

Orange Lemon Shake Ups
This tasty summer beverage comes from Love Grows Wild. Adding a twist of orange to your lemonade never taste so good.

Frozen Coconut Limeade
We found this frozen summer sip on Dessert Now Dinner Later (great name huh?). This drink will certainly keep you cool and refreshed.

Cucumber & Melon White Sangria
This adults- only drink is great for dinner outside, or spending time with friends. This comes to us from Eating Well.


Leave a comment

Don’t Miss Out: Love That Dress! is Summer’s Best Event!

Love-that-Dress-Pace-Center-Kara-VitaWe are just one week away from summer’s best event. Tickets are on sale for Love That Dress! and Just Like Family Home Care is not only a PROUD sponsor, but we are also very involved in the 4th annual event! Owner Elisabeth Nassberg is this year’s co-chair and Michelle Krumm is the volunteer chair. Last night we had our last LTD! dress collection party of the summer at BURN in Mercato and it was, once again, a huge hit! Thank you to BURN for being a great host. Now it’s time to get your tickets for the event! 

WHO BENEFITS  

PACE Center for Girls in Immokalee is a 501(c)3 organization that works with young women between the ages of 12-18 living in at risk situations. PACE provides guidance and educational opportunities giving these girls a path to a successful life. Every dollar that you spend on dresses, ticket sales and silent auction items benefit the PACE girls. Click here for more information on PACE

WHAT IS LOVE THAT DRESS! 

Over the past few months we have collected THOUSANDS of gently loved designer dresses at dozens of LTD! dress collection parties. Women throughout SWFL have generously cleaned out their closets and donated gently loved dresses for this event. We have spent weeks organizing, tagging and getting ready for the big day, which is Saturday August 23rd at The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. Now, it’s time to BUY these amazing dresses at a discounted price. From Gap to Gucci, you will have the opportunity on August 23rd to sift through thousands of designer dresses that are now priced as low as $10. 

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY 

Collier County’s fourth annual Love That Dress! will take place Saturday, Aug. 23 at The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Course. VIP ticket holders will be allowed in at 5 p.m. and get first dibs on the best of the best. General admission ticket holders will get in at 6 p.m. Tickets will be sold at the door if the event doesn’t sell out. General Admission tickets are $30 per person or $150 for VIP. 

Click here to BUY YOUR TICKET TODAY!

 

 

 


Leave a comment

Helping Seniors Prepare for Hurricane Season

Hurricane season is already upon us, as you saw with Hurricane Arthur hitting the Atlantic coast earlier this month. Being in Southwest Florida, it is essential that we make sure to plan ahead and have supplies ready just in case another storm comes our way. What would you do without electricity, water or a way to communicate? While hurricanes affect each and every one of us, senior citizens in particular can be more vulnerable and may need extra help in planning. Many Seniors are in good health, but aren’t quite as agile as they once were. Some have hearing or vision problems, others use a cane or wheelchair. Whatever the limitation, we at Just Like Family Home Care want to make sure our all of our clients are prepared. Whether it’s ensuring they have a full supply of their medications or making sure their supply bag is not too heavy, it’s important to get all the essentials squared away ahead of time.

THE KIT

229

What are some of the first things you think of when putting together a supply kit? Of course food, water, and medicine. But, how much do all of these items weigh? It is best to put these supplies and other necessities in a bag with wheels for added convenience. Ensure the bag has copies of personal documents, contact info cards, and even a cell phone with an extra battery or charger in case.  This bag can be used as a “go” bag in case you or your family member must evacuate.
Water: a rule of thumb for water is one gallon per person, per day, with a two week supply for home and a three day supply for evacuation.

Food: The same rule of thumb for water goes for food, but make sure your food doesn’t require cooking.

Prescription Medication: You should have, at least, a two week supply of all prescription medications along with a list that includes dosage and any allergies. If you or your loved one use any special medical aids like oxygen, catheters, or electric wheelchairs, you need to be sure to have extra supplies for each.

Tools, Flashlights & Cash: You never know when the power will go out so it’s always a good idea to have a multi-purpose tool, flashlight with extra batteries, and manual can opener readily available. We recommend that Seniors have a whistle that can be used to call for help in case of an emergency.

Cash: Consider having cash stashed away because the loss of power will disable ATMs.

Important Papers: put all important papers in a waterproof container. These documents include, but are not limited to your driver’s license, special medical information, medical insurance and Medicare cards, insurance policies, family and physician contact numbers and a list of the style and serial numbers of any medical devices, i.e. pacemaker.

MAKE A PLAN

Be sure to discuss evacuations plans with your family ahead of time. In case you cannot return home, plan an evacuation route and a meeting place. This is especially crucial if you or your loved one uses a wheelchair or is bed ridden. Make sure you assign an out-of-town contact person, because after a natural disaster, it is often easier to make a long-distance phone call, than a local call.

Seniors and those who are disabled will typically need special assistance in order to evacuate. Many cities offer evacuation shelters and it is a good idea to determine your families criteria for when to evacuate ahead of time, so you’re not making this important decision in the middle of the hurricane. You will want to have this conversation as soon as possible, to ensure proper transportation and accommodations. This may mean going to a shelter, hotel, or relative’s home out of town.

Just Like Family Home Care Checklist:

1. _____ Important medical, family contact and insurance information, safe and secure

2. _____ Water ( Two week supply at home, three day supply if evacuating |1 gallon per person, per day)

3. _____ Food (2-week supply of nonperishable food at home, 3-day supply if evacuating)

4. _____ Non-electric can-opener

5. _____ Battery powered radio

6. _____ Flashlights

7. _____ Extra batteries

8. _____ Two-week supply of prescription medication & list that includes dosages and allergies

9. _____ Mosquito repellant

10. _____ First Aid Kit

11. _____ Water purification kit (tablets, plain chlorine and iodine)

12. _____ Pre-moistened towelettes

13. _____ Antibacterial wipes and/or hand sanitizer

14. _____ Walker, wheelchair, and other medical equipment (talk to medical equipment company prior to determine needs for battery or electric powered devices, register with the power company if electricity required for Oxygen or special needs)

If you evacuate, also take:

15. _____ Bedding

16. _____ Extra clothing and shoes

17. _____ Eyeglasses

18. _____ Folding chair or cot

19. _____ Extra hearing aid batteries

20. _____ Walker, wheelchair, and other medical equipment

21. _____ Important papers (in a waterproof container)

a. _____Driver’s license

b. _____ Special medical information

c. _____ Medical insurance and Medicare cards

d. _____ Insurance policies

e. _____ Family and physician contact numbers

f. _____ List of style and serial numbers of medical devices, i.e. pacemaker

Precious commodities before and after a storm:

22. _____ Cash, Ice, Charcoal, Wooden Matches, Grill


Leave a comment

Keeping Seniors Safe in the Summer Sun

BA65396It’s summertime in Naples, Florida and we all know the scenic views come with the price of overwhelming rays from the powerful sun. At Just Like Family Home Care we want to ensure safety in the warm weather! The heat makes summer a dangerous season for everyone, but seniors are at a higher risk of suffering complications from the heat.

Most people don’t realize it, but according to the Huffington Post, extreme summer heat causes thousands of heat-related illnesses in the U.S. each year, and kills more people than hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, floods and earthquakes combined. Seniors are among the most vulnerable.

Many seniors take medications that could dehydrate them or make them more sensitive to the sun. Bodies of older adults also contain far less water than a younger person’s, and older brains don’t recognize thirst as easily, making them more likely to get dehydrated. For seniors who are not as mobile or depend on others to come by to care for them, they may not be able to move themselves to a cooler spot or help themselves if they start feeling heat-sick when they’re by themselves.

There are two main types of heat conditions: heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Both are categorized by dizziness, rapid or weak pulse, bright red skin, clamminess, and spots on the eyes. Both these conditions can cause the body temperature to get upwards toward 103 degrees.

In addition, many seniors have certain health problems that can increase their risk of hyperthermia (when the body overheats). These include:

• Underlying diseases like congestive heart failure, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD.
• Trouble walking or moving around.
• Being overweight.
• Having dementia or other problems with thinking skills.

Suggestions to keep seniors cooler:

  • Wear light colored or loose clothing
  • Use sunscreen, even if going outside for just a short period of time
  • Wear a hat that is wide-brimmed to protect the face (but isn’t so tight as to prevent ventilation)
  • Stay hydrated with water or other non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated drinks
  • Keep a spray bottle with cool water nearby to lightly spritz the face and body
  • A shady spot outdoors may be cooler than inside, so sitting on a covered porch with a portable or ceiling fan may be a good option
  • If you are inside with no AC, stay on the lower floor of your residence (which is typically cooler)
  • Mobile seniors should try to spend a few hours each day in a place with A/C: either a mall, library, a movie, or restaurant

At Just Like Family Home Care, we wish you a safe and COOL summer!


Leave a comment

Staying Cool

It’s the dog days of summer, especially here in Florida.  We’ve gone over how to keep yourself safe in a hurricane if you’re elderly or infirm, so we thought it would be a good time to go over how to stay safe in the heat.  What to look out for, what to do, and what preventative measures you can take, straight from the Centers for Disease Control!

Elderly people (that is, people aged 65 years and older) are more prone to heat stress than younger people for several reasons:

  • Elderly people do not adjust as well as young people to sudden changes in temperature.
  • They are more likely to have a chronic medical condition that changes normal body responses to heat.
  • They are more likely to take prescription medicines that impair the body’s ability to regulate its temperature or that inhibit perspiration.

Heat Stroke

Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the body loses its ability to sweat, and it is unable to cool down. Body temperatures rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided.

Signs and Symptoms of Heat Stroke

Warning signs vary but may include the following:

  • An extremely high body temperature (above 103°F)
  • Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating)
  • Rapid, strong pulse
  • Throbbing headache
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea

Heat Exhaustion

Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids.

Signs and Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

Warning signs vary but may include the following:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Paleness
  • Muscle Cramps
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fainting
  • Skin: may be cool and moist
  • Pulse rate: fast and weak
  • Breathing: fast and shallow

What You Can Do to Protect Yourself

You can follow these prevention tips to protect yourself from heat-related stress:

  • Drink cool, nonalcoholic beverages. (If your doctor generally limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask him how much you should drink when the weather is hot. Also, avoid extremely cold liquids because they can cause cramps.)
  • Rest.
  • Take a cool shower, bath, or sponge bath.
  • If possible, seek an air-conditioned environment. (If you don’t have air conditioning, consider visiting an air-conditioned shopping mall or public library to cool off.)
  • Wear lightweight clothing.
  • If possible, remain indoors in the heat of the day.
  • Do not engage in strenuous activities.

What You Can Do to Help Protect Elderly Relatives and Neighbors

If you have elderly relatives or neighbors, you can help them protect themselves from heat-related stress:

  • Visit older adults at risk at least twice a day and watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke.
  • Encourage them to increase their fluid intake by drinking cool, nonalcoholic beverages regardless of their activity level.
    Warning: If their doctor generally limits the amount of fluid they drink or they are on water pills, they will need to ask their doctor how much they should drink while the weather is hot.
  • Take them to air-conditioned locations if they have transportation problems.

What You Can Do for Someone With Heat Stress

If you see any signs of severe heat stress, you may be dealing with a life-threatening emergency. Have someone call for immediate medical assistance while you begin cooling the affected person. Do the following:

  • Get the person to a shady area.
  • Cool the person rapidly, using whatever methods you can. For example, immerse the person in a tub of cool water; place the person in a cool shower; spray the person with cool water from a garden hose; sponge the person with cool water; or if the humidity is low, wrap the person in a cool, wet sheet and fan him or her vigorously.
  • Monitor body temperature and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101°–102°F
  • If emergency medical personnel are delayed, call the hospital emergency room for further instructions.
  • Do not give the person alcohol to drink.
  • Get medical assistance as soon as possible.