Leave a comment

Southwest Florida Origins

We recently told everyone about our expanded service area…

coverageIn case you missed it, we cover seven counties in Southwest Florida now, Sarasota, DeSoto, Charlotte, Glades, Lee, Hendry, and Collier Counties.  We’re fans of history around here (that massive gallery of old American flags on Independence Day might have given that away…), but in Florida, history usually means Tampa and Miami.  What about Southwest Florida?  Well, we’ve got you covered.  We’re going to go over some of the more interesting history in our coverage area over several blogs, coming back to the subject every now and then.  To kick things off, lets take a quick look at those seven counties.  Specifically, why are they called what they’re called, and where did they come from?  Those county names reflect a lot of the history around here, so let’s get going!

Charlotte County

Seal_of_Charlotte_County,_FloridaFormed out of part of DeSoto county in 1921, the county was named for the Bay of Charlotte Harbor, which was in turn named for Queen Charlotte Sophia, wife of King George III, in 1775.  The Spanish originally called it “Carlos Bay,” so we almost had a “Carlos County”!

Collier County

Seal_of_Collier_County,_Florida

Carved out of Lee County in 1923, Collier County was named for Baron Collier, a New York real estate developer and businessman who moved to SWFL and built the Tamiami Trail for the state in exchange for having a county named after him!

DeSoto County

DeSoto_County_Fl_SealThis one is fairly self-explanatory.  Created in 1887 out of what was then Manatee County, it was named for Hernando de Soto (1496/1497–1542), Spanish explorer and conquistador.  He famously was the first European to cross the Mississippi River, and likely first landed in Florida on that voyage very near modern day DeSoto County.

Glades County

glades

Formed in 1921 from DeSoto County, the county was named after the nearby Everglades, which were, in turn, were named partly by British surveyor John Gerard de Brahm in 1773, who called the area “River Glades.”

Hendry County

county_logo_

Formed out of Lee County in 1923, it was named for Francis A. Hendry (1833–1917), a Florida cattle rancher and politician who was an early settler of the area, and an officer in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.

Lee County

Lee_County_Fl_Seal

Carved out of the original, massive Monroe County in 1887, Lee was named for famed Confederate General Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), and has grown to become, by far, the largest county in Southwest Florida.

Sarasota County

393px-Logo_of_Sarasota_County_FL.svg

Founded in 1921 out of Manatee County.  Believe it or not, the word “Sarasota” is of unknown, probably Native American, origin.  The word has been used in the area since nearly the very beginning of European colonization, but there’s no record of where it came from.  A possibility is that it’s a Calusa (the original Native language in the area) word meaning “point of rocks” or “place of the dance.”  Again, there’s no way to know for sure!


Leave a comment

Celebrating Grandparents on Sunday, September 7th and everyday

grandparents-quotes-for-facebook-2Sunday, September 7th marks Grandparents Day. While this hallmark holiday is not as predominant as Mother’s Day and Father’s Day, it’s certainly a day to remind your grandparents that you love them and appreciate everything that they do for you. My grandparents split time between Florida in the winter and up north in the summer months. As one of 30+ cousins, it’s sometimes hard to get that one-on-one attention, but at least once a year my grandparents make it a priority to see “just me” so I will drive over to the east coast and enjoy dinner, some shopping time with grandma and maybe even a round of golf. My 87 year old grandpa can still play and will even WALK. Now that’s impressive if you ask me. I feel very fortunate at my age to still have living grandparents, something many of my colleagues and friends don’t have.

So this Sunday, make sure you call your grandparents or make plans to stop in if they live near by. Appreciate the time you have with them as you won’t always have them around. Grandparents are a delightful blend of laughter, caring deed, wonderful stories and never ending love! They are the leaders of the family and the reason you and your aunts, uncles, cousins, parents and siblings are who you are. 

What’s your favorite memory with your grandparents or grandchildren? We would love to hear your story! 

grandparents-quotes-love-1

 


Leave a comment

Calculating the Cost of Home Care Infographic

Delivering care to an ill or elderly loved one in their own home ensures their safety, preserves their independence and accommodates hardworking families who are unable to personally address all of their loved one’s needs. As a result, more families are finding that home care is the option their loved ones prefer and their budgets support.

At Just Like Family Home Care, we take pride in aligning the right star with each clients personalized preferences. We believe it is important, as a Naples home health care company, to maintain our clients lifestyle in the comfort of their home, hospital or facility.

Calculating the cist of at home care


1 Comment

Celebrating our Seniors

This May we are celebrating Senior Citizens at Just Like Family Home Care as May is Senior Citizens Month. The history of Senior Citizens Month goes back half of a century.

According to the Administration on Aging, when Older Americans Month was established in 1963, only 17 million living Americans had reached their 65th birthdays. About a third of older Americans lived in poverty and there were few programs to meet their needs. Interest in older Americans and their concerns was growing, however. In April of 1963, President John F. Kennedy’s meeting with the National Council of Senior Citizens served as a prelude to designating May as “Senior Citizens Month.”

Thanks to President Jimmy Carter’s 1980 designation, what was once called Senior Citizens Month, is now called “Older Americans Month,” and has become a tradition.

Historically, Older Americans Month has been a time to acknowledge the contributions of past and current older persons to our country, in particular those who defended our country. Every President since JFK has issued a formal proclamation during or before the month ofMay asking that the entire nation pay tribute in some way to older persons in their communities. Older Americans Month is celebrated across the Coun
try through ceremonies, events, fairs and other such activities.

The older population–persons 65 years or older–numbered 39.6 million in 2009 (the latest year for which data is available). They represented 12.9% of the U.S. population, about one in every eight Americans. By 2030, there will be about 72.1 million older persons, more than twice their number in 2000. People 65+ represented 12.4% of the population in the year 2000 but are expected to grow to be 19% of the population by 2030. 

At Just Like FamiImagely, we see the growth first hand and we know many of our local Seniors are in need of more than just caregivers. They need everyday toiletries, clothing, cards and more. Join us Wednesday May 14 from 5-7:30 p.m. for a Celebrity Bartender Night at Noodles Italian Cafe & Sushi Bar in Naples to celebrate Senior Citizens Month. A $20 donation at the door will provide you with a drink ticket and food.

 


Leave a comment

Mapping Aging (Again)

Not too long ago, we poured over some really interesting maps about aging trends in the United States.  Those maps showed county-by-county trends, and essentially brought us to the conclusion that we are slowly aging as a country, especially in Florida, and less-so in the Mountain West.  But how do we stack up against the rest of the world?  The answer says a lot about where we’re going as a country.

Here’s the median age in each state as of 2010.

0YJXFYeJust like before, the trends are obvious.  Older, more developed Northeastern states are more aged, the rugged, relatively unpopulated Mountain West is younger, and New England, Pennsylvania and Florida are the oldest areas in the country.  Let’s parse this down further, and look at a big county-by-county map.

6Oce7na

It’s very interesting to see it this way.  The county maps from last time showed trends into the future, this map shows the age of each county right now.  It’s very unexpected that Maine is the overall oldest state by median age, though!  But less surprising is the presence of the country’s oldest county, Sumter County, in Florida.

Now, let’s look at trends for the entire world, with the under 30 percentage in each country in 2005, and the projection of the same in 2025…

world_age_structure_2005_2025It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see where the shift is occurring there.  The more “developed” countries are getting older, while the less “developed” countries are getting younger as their populations explode.  The reasons are pretty easy to guess: easy access to birth control in the “Developed World” alongside far greater longevity and more comprehensive healthcare services in those countries letting more people live longer.  The areas of the world that are healthiest are understandably becoming the oldest!

Let’s take a look at two specific examples to make this more clear…

1280px-Australian_Census_2011_demographic_map_-_Australia_by_SLA_-_BCP_field_0109_Median_age_of_persons.svg

This is the average age in each Australian Land District.  Australia is a country very similar to the United States, with a colonial heritage derived from the British Empire that started on a vast, untamed continent, with an even more untamed West and interior.  The main differences are that the country is younger, and that the continent in question is a bit more inhospitable than North America was (to put it mildly).  The demographics reflect that, with a pattern similar to the United States’, but more extreme.  The giant Great Victoria and Gibson Deserts have extremely young populations, just like the American Mountain West and Alaska do, as does the relatively unpopulated Northern Territory.  The older, major coastal cities and their sprawls, Gold Coast, Brisbane, Newcastle, Sydney, Canberra, and Melbourne, make a line along the country’s southeast coast that fills the area with an older population, just like the American Northeast Corridor.  Additional splotches of red surround the other large cities, Adelaide and Perth.  You can see the trends developing that in a few more decades will make Australia’s age map will look a lot like ours does now as the continent fills-in with more people,.  So this is where we were around 50 years ago.  Where will we be 50 years from now?

Let’s look to an unlikely place for the future…

Naselja-median_starostiWeren’t expecting that, were you?  Croatia is a prime example of where the US is going in regards to aging, as it’s a very developed European country, but not as extreme an example as countries in Western and Northern Europe, thanks mostly to the relatively recent wars in the region.  As you can see, even the youngest areas bottom out at an average of around 35 years, with huge swaths of the country averaging in the mid-50s in age.  This is where we are going, as our health improves, and our lives get longer, and our birth rate slows.  Essentially, while we still think of ourselves in terms of our cultural and political competitors, like Russia, China and Brazil, we’re actually slowly turning into the United Kingdom and Japan in terms of demographics.  It will be extremely interesting to see how that affects our character as a country moving forward.


Leave a comment

50 Over 50

4ff61b8fc650d.image

With a new year comes the realization that the world is another year in what we used to think of as “the future,” and that our childhoods and youth are further and further behind.  But that isn’t a bad thing!  We believe very strongly here at Just Like Family that aging isn’t automatically a bad thing, and, in fact, can bring wonderful benefits with it, like the memories, experience and wisdom that come with the times younger people never lived through.  Which is why we think this list of 50 things people over 50 understand that no one else does is the perfect way to kick off 2014 here on the blog.  You might not think all of these things are “good,” but all of them are absolutely interesting, and it’s incredibly important to acknowledge them, because we can’t know where we’re going in a brand new year if we don’t know where we’ve been!  For example…

“When mail would come twice a day.”

“Burma Shave signs.”

“On a lighter note, the ladies always dressed up to go shopping, dresses or skirts/blouses/sweaters, heels with seamed nylons, hats/gloves. Men wore ties and jackets.”

“Air raid drills in NJ, during the 1950s — having to get under your desk in school or behind a sofa at home with all the shades and curtains pulled, no lights on. Then you’d hear an airplane fly overhead and be terrified it was a bomber.”

“Tin foil on rabbit ears and TV remotes that were connected to the TV with a cord.”

Feel the nostalgia with the rest of the list over HERE on The Huffington Post.


Leave a comment

The Sunshine State

We’ve made no secret of the fact that we’re proud to call Florida, the Sunshine State home, but let’s be honest: Florida gets overlooked a lot when people talk about interesting histories or facts about states.  Everyone’s too busy focusing on the weather and DisneyWorld!  It might be because although we’re geographically in the American South, Florida is very different culturally from the rest of the South unless you’re talking about the northernmost part of the state.  People don’t know where to place us!  So, in honor of the state we call home, here are 25 interesting facts and historical oddities about our state!

  1. The so-called “Five Flags of Florida” are the flags of the Spanish Empire (flown 1565-1763), the Kingdom of Great Britain (flown 1763-1784), Spain (flown 1784-1821), the Confederate States of America (flown 1861-1865), and the United States of America (flown 1784-1861 and 1865 to present).
  2. Clearwater, FL, is the most lightning-struck (per capita) city in the United States.
  3. Florida is the most visited state in the country, with nearly 80 million visitors every year.
  4. Florida produces more citrus fruit, tomatoes, green peppers, watermelons, sweetcorn and sugar than any other state.
  5. The muckland south of Lake Okeechobee is the largest body of organic soil on Earth.
  6. Lake Okeechobee is actually a massive sink hole, a gigantic indentation in the limestone bedrock of the state.
  7. The longest river sailboat race in the world is the Annual Mug Race, running 42 miles from Palatka, FL to Jacksonville, FL along the St. Johns River.
  8. The official state song, “Old Folks at Home (Suwannee River),” was written by Stephen Foster, who never set foot in Florida, and chose the river because he and his brother saw it on a map and decided it “sounded best.”
  9. Florida produces 75% of America’s oranges, and an absurd 40% of the entire planet’s supply of oranges!
  10. DeFuniak Springs, FL is home to one of the two almost perfectly round natural lakes in the world, Lake DeFuniak.
  11. Plant City, FL holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s largest strawberry shortcake: 827 square-feet, 6,000 pounds.
  12. Key West, FL has the highest average temperature of any municipality in the United States.
  13. The world’s first scheduled passenger service airline flight was flown in 1914 from St. Petersburg, FL to Tampa, FL.
  14. Mechanical refrigeration technology was invented in Apalachicola, FL in 1851 by Dr. John Gorrie.
  15. St. Augustine, FL is the oldest continuously inhabited non-native settlement in North America, founded in 1565 by Spanish admiral Pedro Menéndez de Avilés.
  16. The most active hurricane season in recorded history for Florida is a tie between 2004, when four full-fledged hurricanes, Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne, came ashore in the state, and 2005, when another four, Dennis, Katrina (yes, THAT Katrina), Rita and Wilma all came ashore here.
  17. Florida has the 4th largest state population in the county, the 4th largest state GDP in the country, and is the 4th largest state-level exporter in the country.
  18. The horse, which had been extinct in North America for about 10,000 years when the Europeans first arrived, was first reintroduced to the continent in Florida in 1538.
  19. Crystal River, FL is the only place in North America where it is legal to have a supervised swim with manatees.
  20. The world’s deepest freshwater spring is Wakulla Springs near Tallahassee, FL.
  21. “Florida” means “Feast of Flowers” in Spanish.
  22. Jacksonville is the largest city in Florida by population, with 836,507 people as of 2012, but Miami, the state’s second largest city by population, had 413,892 people in 2012 packed into less than 1/21 of Jacksonville’s land area!
  23. There were 1.6 million veterans living in Florida as of 2010, the second highest total in the country.
  24. The largest collection of Frank Lloyd Wright buildings in the world is in Lakeland, FL.
  25. About half of all Major League Baseball teams have spring training in Florida, with teams organized into the informal “Grapefruit League.”